The Role of Dispersal in Structuring the Chitwan Tiger Population

The Role of Dispersal in Structuring the Chitwan Tiger Population THE ROLE OF DISPERSAL IN STRUCTURING THE CHITWAN TIGER POPULATION by JAMES L. DAVID SMITH 1) (Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, 200 Hodson Hall, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108, U.S.A.) (With 9 Figures) (Acc. 27-I-1993) Summary Dispersal in tigers was studied in Royal Chitwan National Park, Nepal. Thirty six adult and young were studied to monitor movements and social interactions relative to dispersal. Fourteen subadults were followed from before their dispersal until they died or established post-dispersal territories. Subadult tigers became semi-independent of their mother when her next litter was born. They usually remained within her natal area until the subsequent litter began to move with her at about 2 mos of age. Animals dispersed between 19 and 28 mos. Males dispersed farther than females and settled in poorer habitat. Three of 4 females settled adjacent to their mothers; in two cases the mother shifted her territory allowing the daughter to take over a large portion of the mother's former territory. Wounds on young prior to dispersal indicated that aggression prompted dispersal. Fjghts were observed between dispersers and residents. After fights, dispersers always left the resident's area. All 4 dispersing females established breeding territories. Females settled http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

The Role of Dispersal in Structuring the Chitwan Tiger Population

Behaviour, Volume 124 (3-4): 165 – Jan 1, 1993

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1993 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
DOI
10.1163/156853993X00560
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE ROLE OF DISPERSAL IN STRUCTURING THE CHITWAN TIGER POPULATION by JAMES L. DAVID SMITH 1) (Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, 200 Hodson Hall, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108, U.S.A.) (With 9 Figures) (Acc. 27-I-1993) Summary Dispersal in tigers was studied in Royal Chitwan National Park, Nepal. Thirty six adult and young were studied to monitor movements and social interactions relative to dispersal. Fourteen subadults were followed from before their dispersal until they died or established post-dispersal territories. Subadult tigers became semi-independent of their mother when her next litter was born. They usually remained within her natal area until the subsequent litter began to move with her at about 2 mos of age. Animals dispersed between 19 and 28 mos. Males dispersed farther than females and settled in poorer habitat. Three of 4 females settled adjacent to their mothers; in two cases the mother shifted her territory allowing the daughter to take over a large portion of the mother's former territory. Wounds on young prior to dispersal indicated that aggression prompted dispersal. Fjghts were observed between dispersers and residents. After fights, dispersers always left the resident's area. All 4 dispersing females established breeding territories. Females settled

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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