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The Rohingya: Myanmar’s Unwanted Minority

The Rohingya: Myanmar’s Unwanted Minority This article analyses the plight of Myanmar’s unwanted people— the Rohingya. Although they have inhabited the country for centuries, the Rohingya are not listed as one of the 135 legally recognized ethnic groups by the state and are therefore categorized as illegal immigrants. Rendered stateless, subject to decades of oppression and systematic human rights violations by the country’s successive governments, these people have now become, according to the UN, the most persecuted minority in the world. While an estimated 1.5 to 2 million Rohingya once lived in Myanmar, only around one- fifth remain at present. Over the last four decades, almost two thirds of its population have fled the country due to state- sponsored ethnic persecution. This article addresses: the reason for the Rohingya’s statelessness; their disputed origins and the issue of Rohingya identity; the context of the Rohingya crisis; the nature of human rights violations against the community; the situation of the Rohingya in Bangladesh; and, finally, international reaction to the crisis. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Yearbook of Minority Issues Online Brill

The Rohingya: Myanmar’s Unwanted Minority

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
eISSN
2211-6117
DOI
10.1163/22116117_01801011
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article analyses the plight of Myanmar’s unwanted people— the Rohingya. Although they have inhabited the country for centuries, the Rohingya are not listed as one of the 135 legally recognized ethnic groups by the state and are therefore categorized as illegal immigrants. Rendered stateless, subject to decades of oppression and systematic human rights violations by the country’s successive governments, these people have now become, according to the UN, the most persecuted minority in the world. While an estimated 1.5 to 2 million Rohingya once lived in Myanmar, only around one- fifth remain at present. Over the last four decades, almost two thirds of its population have fled the country due to state- sponsored ethnic persecution. This article addresses: the reason for the Rohingya’s statelessness; their disputed origins and the issue of Rohingya identity; the context of the Rohingya crisis; the nature of human rights violations against the community; the situation of the Rohingya in Bangladesh; and, finally, international reaction to the crisis.

Journal

European Yearbook of Minority Issues OnlineBrill

Published: Jun 1, 2021

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