The Riyadha Mosque Manuscript collection in Lamu, Kenya

The Riyadha Mosque Manuscript collection in Lamu, Kenya In Lamu, Islamic practice and intellectual traditions in the late nineteenth century has been profoundly marked by the Riyadha mosque, established near the end of the century by Ṣāliḥ b. ʿAlawī Jamal al-Layl, known in East Africa as Habib Saleh (1853–1936). He was a descendant of early migrants from Ḥaḍramawt, Yemen, who by the late 1800s had branched out to the urban centres of East Africa, including Zanzibar and the Comoro Islands. As part of the stratum known collectively as the ʿAlawī sāda , the Jamal al-Layl family was also known to adhere to the brand of Sufism known as the ṭarīqa ʿAlawiyya. Habib Saleh was born in Grande Comore, but settled permanently in Lamu some time in the late 1870s or early 1880s. His biography has been documented in earlier studies and will not be repeated here. 1 However, one aspect that must be addressed is Habib Saleh’s close connection with intellectual developments in Ḥaḍramawt. This was most explicitly formulated in his spiritual connection to his Sufi master in Ḥaḍramawt, the renowned teacher, saint and scholar ʿAlī b. Muḥammad al-Ḥibshī (d. 1915). The two men actually never met in the “real world”, 2 but al-Ḥibshī’s impact on http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Islamic Africa (continuation of Sudanic Africa) Brill

The Riyadha Mosque Manuscript collection in Lamu, Kenya

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/the-riyadha-mosque-manuscript-collection-in-lamu-kenya-OGw3Zr2wlZ
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2015 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
Subject
Sources and Commentary
ISSN
0803-0685
eISSN
2154-0993
D.O.I.
10.1163/21540993-00602015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In Lamu, Islamic practice and intellectual traditions in the late nineteenth century has been profoundly marked by the Riyadha mosque, established near the end of the century by Ṣāliḥ b. ʿAlawī Jamal al-Layl, known in East Africa as Habib Saleh (1853–1936). He was a descendant of early migrants from Ḥaḍramawt, Yemen, who by the late 1800s had branched out to the urban centres of East Africa, including Zanzibar and the Comoro Islands. As part of the stratum known collectively as the ʿAlawī sāda , the Jamal al-Layl family was also known to adhere to the brand of Sufism known as the ṭarīqa ʿAlawiyya. Habib Saleh was born in Grande Comore, but settled permanently in Lamu some time in the late 1870s or early 1880s. His biography has been documented in earlier studies and will not be repeated here. 1 However, one aspect that must be addressed is Habib Saleh’s close connection with intellectual developments in Ḥaḍramawt. This was most explicitly formulated in his spiritual connection to his Sufi master in Ḥaḍramawt, the renowned teacher, saint and scholar ʿAlī b. Muḥammad al-Ḥibshī (d. 1915). The two men actually never met in the “real world”, 2 but al-Ḥibshī’s impact on

Journal

Islamic Africa (continuation of Sudanic Africa)Brill

Published: Jul 6, 2015

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed
Create lists to
organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off