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The Return of the Repressed: Schelling, Kierkegaard, and Nachträglichkeit in the Legacy of German Idealism

The Return of the Repressed: Schelling, Kierkegaard, and Nachträglichkeit in the Legacy of German... 134 Review Articles / Research in Phenomenology 41 (2011) 109–154 The Return of the Repressed: Schelling, Kierkegaard, and Nachträglich- keit in the Legacy of German Idealism Lore Hühn. Kierkegaard und der Deutsche Idealismus: Konstellationen des Über- gangs . Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2009. 259 pp. Index. Hegel . . . despite all of his outstanding ability and stupendous learning, reminds us again and again by his performance that he was in the German sense a professor of philosophy on a large scale, because he à tout prix must explain all things. Kierkegaard, The Concept of Anxiety I. The Schellingian Trajectory in the Legacy of German idealism From November 15, 1841, until February 4, 1842, the large and clamorous audience that greeted Schelling’s return to the public limelight in Berlin, a decade after Hegel had died, included Søren Kierkegaard in one of his exceed- ingly rare departures from Copenhagen. He took assiduous notes as Schelling invoked the tumultuous philosophical confrontations that had preceded him, including the dissolution of Schelling’s relationship with Fichte over the limits of subjectivity, and the rise of Hegel, who had commandeered the Weltgeist in his professional ascendency but whose ghost haunts Schelling’s lectures. In a sense, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

The Return of the Repressed: Schelling, Kierkegaard, and Nachträglichkeit in the Legacy of German Idealism

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 41 (1): 134 – Jan 1, 2011

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2011 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916411X558963
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

134 Review Articles / Research in Phenomenology 41 (2011) 109–154 The Return of the Repressed: Schelling, Kierkegaard, and Nachträglich- keit in the Legacy of German Idealism Lore Hühn. Kierkegaard und der Deutsche Idealismus: Konstellationen des Über- gangs . Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2009. 259 pp. Index. Hegel . . . despite all of his outstanding ability and stupendous learning, reminds us again and again by his performance that he was in the German sense a professor of philosophy on a large scale, because he à tout prix must explain all things. Kierkegaard, The Concept of Anxiety I. The Schellingian Trajectory in the Legacy of German idealism From November 15, 1841, until February 4, 1842, the large and clamorous audience that greeted Schelling’s return to the public limelight in Berlin, a decade after Hegel had died, included Søren Kierkegaard in one of his exceed- ingly rare departures from Copenhagen. He took assiduous notes as Schelling invoked the tumultuous philosophical confrontations that had preceded him, including the dissolution of Schelling’s relationship with Fichte over the limits of subjectivity, and the rise of Hegel, who had commandeered the Weltgeist in his professional ascendency but whose ghost haunts Schelling’s lectures. In a sense,

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2011

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