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The Resource Curse: A Legal Perspective

The Resource Curse: A Legal Perspective Global Governance 17 (2011), 197–212 The Resource Curse: A Legal Perspective Jorge E. Viñuales This article analyzes the different dimensions of the so-called resource curse hypothesis from the perspective of international and domestic law. The analysis is structured as a commentary of the views of the UK-based philosopher Leif Wenar and the Swiss philosopher Peter Schaber on this issue. The article concludes that, under current legal arrangements, states remain the main guarantors of the public good of the people living under their sovereignty. Thus, for better or worse as long as, from a political or an ethical standpoint, peoples are sovereign, they will also continue to as- sume the main responsibility for their own development even when their house is not in order. KEYWORDS: resource curse, resource ownership, inter- national law, domestic law, Ogoni, Equatorial Guinea. The superfluous of the rich should serve for the necessity of the poor; yet, quite to the contrary, the necessity of the poor serves for the superfluous of the rich. —Jean Domat IN TWO RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PHILOSOPHY LITERATURE, ONE BY THE UK-based philosopher Leif Wenar and the other by the Swiss philosopher Peter Schaber, these authors engage in an interesting discussion http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-01702007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 17 (2011), 197–212 The Resource Curse: A Legal Perspective Jorge E. Viñuales This article analyzes the different dimensions of the so-called resource curse hypothesis from the perspective of international and domestic law. The analysis is structured as a commentary of the views of the UK-based philosopher Leif Wenar and the Swiss philosopher Peter Schaber on this issue. The article concludes that, under current legal arrangements, states remain the main guarantors of the public good of the people living under their sovereignty. Thus, for better or worse as long as, from a political or an ethical standpoint, peoples are sovereign, they will also continue to as- sume the main responsibility for their own development even when their house is not in order. KEYWORDS: resource curse, resource ownership, inter- national law, domestic law, Ogoni, Equatorial Guinea. The superfluous of the rich should serve for the necessity of the poor; yet, quite to the contrary, the necessity of the poor serves for the superfluous of the rich. —Jean Domat IN TWO RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PHILOSOPHY LITERATURE, ONE BY THE UK-based philosopher Leif Wenar and the other by the Swiss philosopher Peter Schaber, these authors engage in an interesting discussion

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 12, 2011

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