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The Relationship Between Rhetoric and Terrorist Violence. Edited by Allison G. Smith. London: Routledge, 2013.

The Relationship Between Rhetoric and Terrorist Violence. Edited by Allison G. Smith. London:... Book Reviews 349 For example, Schabas explores how cases are selected for international prosecution, arguing that there is an unavoidable political dimension to selec- tion not present at the domestic level. Because of political considerations, the citizens of some powerful states may be off limits. Obtaining the coopera- tion of witnesses may mean that only one side to a conflict is prosecuted, even if both sides committed crimes. Moreover, because resources are lim- ited, prosecutors have to choose among atrocities committed in different parts of the world. He also explores policy and politics by focusing on the “tension between amnesty and international prosecution” (p. 196). Here, Schabas takes on those who argue that there is no peace without justice and that amnesties, in fact, cannot lead to lasting peace. Instead, he suggests such claims are unproven, and urges policymakers to consider the possibility that in some cases peace might be obtained only if justice is sacrificed. Perhaps the main shortcoming of the book is that it leaves readers want- ing more since many of the chapters themselves could likely be expanded into a book. This is an engaging book for both novices and experts in inter- national criminal law. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

The Relationship Between Rhetoric and Terrorist Violence. Edited by Allison G. Smith. London: Routledge, 2013.

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-02002015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Reviews 349 For example, Schabas explores how cases are selected for international prosecution, arguing that there is an unavoidable political dimension to selec- tion not present at the domestic level. Because of political considerations, the citizens of some powerful states may be off limits. Obtaining the coopera- tion of witnesses may mean that only one side to a conflict is prosecuted, even if both sides committed crimes. Moreover, because resources are lim- ited, prosecutors have to choose among atrocities committed in different parts of the world. He also explores policy and politics by focusing on the “tension between amnesty and international prosecution” (p. 196). Here, Schabas takes on those who argue that there is no peace without justice and that amnesties, in fact, cannot lead to lasting peace. Instead, he suggests such claims are unproven, and urges policymakers to consider the possibility that in some cases peace might be obtained only if justice is sacrificed. Perhaps the main shortcoming of the book is that it leaves readers want- ing more since many of the chapters themselves could likely be expanded into a book. This is an engaging book for both novices and experts in inter- national criminal law.

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 19, 2014

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