THE QUMRAN SUNDIAL AS AN ODOMETER USING FIXED LENGTHS OF HOURS

THE QUMRAN SUNDIAL AS AN ODOMETER USING FIXED LENGTHS OF HOURS 1 Herodotus ( Ž fth century bce ) 2, 109: ÒKnowledge of the sundial and the gnomon and the twelve divisions of the day came into Greece from Babylon.Ó 2 A. Roitman, A Day at Qumran: The Dead Sea Sect and Its Scrolls (Jerusalem: The Israel Museum, 1997). THE QUMRAN SUNDIAL AS AN ODOMETER USING FIXED LENGTHS OF HOURS BARBARA THIERING Sydney, Australia With the discovery of the small stone sundial at Qumran, there is further evidence of the Qumran interest in the measurement of time. But although the main purpose of the object is evident, there has been di fŽ culty in understanding how it actually worked. The circular object with rings and marks was manufactured out of limestone in the shape of a  at basin with a low rim, and is only 14.5 cm (about six inches) in diameter (Diagram A). A depression in the centre was obviously intended to hold a short upright stick, the gno- mon, whose shadow fell at di ff erent places according to the season and hour. The existence of such devices for measuring the equinoxes and solstices by shadows is attested in ancient sources. 1 The series of rings http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Dead Sea Discoveries Brill

THE QUMRAN SUNDIAL AS AN ODOMETER USING FIXED LENGTHS OF HOURS

Dead Sea Discoveries, Volume 9 (3): 347 – Jan 1, 2002

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2002 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0929-0761
eISSN
1568-5179
D.O.I.
10.1163/156851702320917850
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Herodotus ( Ž fth century bce ) 2, 109: ÒKnowledge of the sundial and the gnomon and the twelve divisions of the day came into Greece from Babylon.Ó 2 A. Roitman, A Day at Qumran: The Dead Sea Sect and Its Scrolls (Jerusalem: The Israel Museum, 1997). THE QUMRAN SUNDIAL AS AN ODOMETER USING FIXED LENGTHS OF HOURS BARBARA THIERING Sydney, Australia With the discovery of the small stone sundial at Qumran, there is further evidence of the Qumran interest in the measurement of time. But although the main purpose of the object is evident, there has been di fŽ culty in understanding how it actually worked. The circular object with rings and marks was manufactured out of limestone in the shape of a  at basin with a low rim, and is only 14.5 cm (about six inches) in diameter (Diagram A). A depression in the centre was obviously intended to hold a short upright stick, the gno- mon, whose shadow fell at di ff erent places according to the season and hour. The existence of such devices for measuring the equinoxes and solstices by shadows is attested in ancient sources. 1 The series of rings

Journal

Dead Sea DiscoveriesBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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