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The Question of Being in Recent Japanese Phenomenology

The Question of Being in Recent Japanese Phenomenology 281 The Question of Being in Recent Japanese Phenomenology Keiji Nishitani, Religion and Nothingness. Translated with an Intro- duction by Jan Van Bragt. Forward by Winston L. King. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1982. 317 pp. This critique of the Western crises of theism and selfhood, by a former Japanese student of Heidegger's in Freiburg, may find a surprising kind of welcome in the West, when and if the methods of French post- structuralist criticism-in particular those derived from Jacques Derrida- begin to be employed in the philosophy of religion. So suggests Emeritus Professor Winston L. King of Vanderbilt University in his forward to Keiji Nishitani's recently translated Religion and Nothingness. Incentives for such a remark are not hard to find in this book. They present themselves in the central thesis of its author, replete with suggestive nuances and repeated as so many variations on a single theme. The long-dominant Christian and Greek rationalist traditions of Western civilization, he says, have been irretrievably undermined by their own inherent logic, leaving a progeny of runaway technology and an irreversible drift toward nihilism. The threat posed by such nihilism cannot be overcome by a simple return to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

The Question of Being in Recent Japanese Phenomenology

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 14 (1): 281 – Jan 1, 1984

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1984 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916484X00169
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

281 The Question of Being in Recent Japanese Phenomenology Keiji Nishitani, Religion and Nothingness. Translated with an Intro- duction by Jan Van Bragt. Forward by Winston L. King. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1982. 317 pp. This critique of the Western crises of theism and selfhood, by a former Japanese student of Heidegger's in Freiburg, may find a surprising kind of welcome in the West, when and if the methods of French post- structuralist criticism-in particular those derived from Jacques Derrida- begin to be employed in the philosophy of religion. So suggests Emeritus Professor Winston L. King of Vanderbilt University in his forward to Keiji Nishitani's recently translated Religion and Nothingness. Incentives for such a remark are not hard to find in this book. They present themselves in the central thesis of its author, replete with suggestive nuances and repeated as so many variations on a single theme. The long-dominant Christian and Greek rationalist traditions of Western civilization, he says, have been irretrievably undermined by their own inherent logic, leaving a progeny of runaway technology and an irreversible drift toward nihilism. The threat posed by such nihilism cannot be overcome by a simple return to

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1984

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