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The Politics of the MAI

The Politics of the MAI INTRODUCTION In October 1998, after a six-month pause, three years of negotiations for a Multilateral Agreement on Investment (MAi) at the Organisation for Economic Co- operation and Development (OECD) ended without yielding an agreement. As early as April 1998, when the negotiating parties agreed to the pause, speculations and arguments as to the reasons for that initial setback abounded. The degree to which a growing social opposition to the MAI played a role in the demise of the negotiations has been disputed ever since. Equally unanswered were questions as to why the MAI had generated one of the most vociferous opposition campaigns ever waged against such negotiations. This article addresses these two related questions. The analysis provides a comprehensive view of the conditions that enabled opponents of the MAI to have an impact on the negotiations by documenting: - the long-lasting difficulties encountered early on in the negotiations; - the political weight that the forum of choice for the negotiations provided some parties; - the effective campaigns that caused a political backlash in most OECD countries; and - the political changes that contributed to the lending of support to these campaigns. The reasons for the effective campaigning are http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World Investment and Trade Brill

The Politics of the MAI

Journal of World Investment and Trade , Volume 1 (2): 28 – Jan 1, 2000

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1660-7112
eISSN
2211-9000
DOI
10.1163/221190000X00122
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTION In October 1998, after a six-month pause, three years of negotiations for a Multilateral Agreement on Investment (MAi) at the Organisation for Economic Co- operation and Development (OECD) ended without yielding an agreement. As early as April 1998, when the negotiating parties agreed to the pause, speculations and arguments as to the reasons for that initial setback abounded. The degree to which a growing social opposition to the MAI played a role in the demise of the negotiations has been disputed ever since. Equally unanswered were questions as to why the MAI had generated one of the most vociferous opposition campaigns ever waged against such negotiations. This article addresses these two related questions. The analysis provides a comprehensive view of the conditions that enabled opponents of the MAI to have an impact on the negotiations by documenting: - the long-lasting difficulties encountered early on in the negotiations; - the political weight that the forum of choice for the negotiations provided some parties; - the effective campaigns that caused a political backlash in most OECD countries; and - the political changes that contributed to the lending of support to these campaigns. The reasons for the effective campaigning are

Journal

Journal of World Investment and TradeBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2000

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