The Politics of Interpretation in Basil of Caesarea's Hexaemeron*

The Politics of Interpretation in Basil of Caesarea's Hexaemeron* THE POLITICS OF INTERPRETATION IN BASIL OF CAESAREA'S HEXAEMERON* BY RICHARD LIM The Hexaemeron of Basil the Great (t 379), delivered before a Caesarean congregation on three separate days in mid-378 towards the end of his career, is often held up as an example of Basil's opposition to the allegorical method of exegesis.' The locus classicus for this con- clusion is Basil's discussion of the meaning of the creation of the firma- ment, and in the ninth homily where he makes an even more explicit stand against the use of allegorical interpretations and declares that he prefers the literal sense: WS ezpyizott 06<mq In the Hexaemeron and elsewhere, Basil shows a familiarity with the allegorical method. In about 358, he and Gregory of Nazianzus edited the Philocalia, a compilation of the writings of their admired Origen. 3 The first section of the Philocalia is devoted to Origen's exegetical prin- ciples. The selection is concerned with the divine inspiration of scrip- tures, the problems of biblical language and stresses the importance of spiritual exegesis." Therefore, there can be no question that Basil was well acquainted with what is commonly called the "Alexandrian" allegorical method. The fact that he included http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Vigiliae Christianae Brill

The Politics of Interpretation in Basil of Caesarea's Hexaemeron*

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/the-politics-of-interpretation-in-basil-of-caesarea-s-hexaemeron-c3KWo53gNI
Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
© 1990 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0042-6032
eISSN
1570-0720
D.O.I.
10.1163/157007290X00117
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE POLITICS OF INTERPRETATION IN BASIL OF CAESAREA'S HEXAEMERON* BY RICHARD LIM The Hexaemeron of Basil the Great (t 379), delivered before a Caesarean congregation on three separate days in mid-378 towards the end of his career, is often held up as an example of Basil's opposition to the allegorical method of exegesis.' The locus classicus for this con- clusion is Basil's discussion of the meaning of the creation of the firma- ment, and in the ninth homily where he makes an even more explicit stand against the use of allegorical interpretations and declares that he prefers the literal sense: WS ezpyizott 06<mq In the Hexaemeron and elsewhere, Basil shows a familiarity with the allegorical method. In about 358, he and Gregory of Nazianzus edited the Philocalia, a compilation of the writings of their admired Origen. 3 The first section of the Philocalia is devoted to Origen's exegetical prin- ciples. The selection is concerned with the divine inspiration of scrip- tures, the problems of biblical language and stresses the importance of spiritual exegesis." Therefore, there can be no question that Basil was well acquainted with what is commonly called the "Alexandrian" allegorical method. The fact that he included

Journal

Vigiliae ChristianaeBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1990

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off