The Political Economy of Food Aid in an Era of Agricultural Biotechnology

The Political Economy of Food Aid in an Era of Agricultural Biotechnology Global Governance 11 (2005), 467– 485 The Political Economy of Food Aid in an Era of Agricultural Biotechnology Jennifer Clapp Recent years have seen numerous rejections of food aid containing genetically modified organisms (GMOs). The United States, as the prin- cipal donor of this aid, went on the defensive and blamed the Euro- pean Union for hunger in developing countries. Rarely is food aid rejected. And rarely do food aid donors act so strongly to blame other donors. The reaction of both donors and recipients is also puzzling because it contradicts much of the literature from the 1990s that argued that the international food aid regime had become largely “depoliticized” following reforms to food aid policies in the 1980s. The current literature on food aid has not adequately addressed the ways in which the advent of GMOs has affected the food aid regime. I argue that scientific debates over the safety of GMOs, and economic factors tied to the market for genetically modified crops—both highly political issues—are extremely relevant to current debates on food aid. KEYWORDS: food aid, agricultural biotechnology, genetically modified organisms (GMOs), Africa, developing countries. n 2002, the United States sent significant quantities of food aid, in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

The Political Economy of Food Aid in an Era of Agricultural Biotechnology

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-01104005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 11 (2005), 467– 485 The Political Economy of Food Aid in an Era of Agricultural Biotechnology Jennifer Clapp Recent years have seen numerous rejections of food aid containing genetically modified organisms (GMOs). The United States, as the prin- cipal donor of this aid, went on the defensive and blamed the Euro- pean Union for hunger in developing countries. Rarely is food aid rejected. And rarely do food aid donors act so strongly to blame other donors. The reaction of both donors and recipients is also puzzling because it contradicts much of the literature from the 1990s that argued that the international food aid regime had become largely “depoliticized” following reforms to food aid policies in the 1980s. The current literature on food aid has not adequately addressed the ways in which the advent of GMOs has affected the food aid regime. I argue that scientific debates over the safety of GMOs, and economic factors tied to the market for genetically modified crops—both highly political issues—are extremely relevant to current debates on food aid. KEYWORDS: food aid, agricultural biotechnology, genetically modified organisms (GMOs), Africa, developing countries. n 2002, the United States sent significant quantities of food aid, in

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 3, 2005

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