The Poetics of exôleia in Homer

The Poetics of exôleia in Homer © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2010 DOI: 10.1163/156852510X456156 Mnemosyne 63 (2010) 353-380 brill.nl/mnem Th e Poetics of exôleia in Homer Renaud Gagné University of Cambridge, Faculty of Classics, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge CB3 9DA, UK rg404@cam.ac.uk Received: September 2008; accepted: November 2008 Abstract Th e notion of delayed generational punishment, or ancestral fault, has a long his- tory in Greek literature. Th e identifi cation of its earliest attestations in the Archaic period is contested, especially its presence in Homeric poetry. Th is paper aims to show that delayed generational punishment does indeed appear in Homer, where it is, however, confi ned to one context: the great oath of exôleia of Iliad 3.298-301 and 4.155-65. Th e institutional and ritual context of the generational oath is essential to understanding this earliest Greek attestation of ancestral fault, and making sense of the idea’s larger signifi cance for narrative perspective, divine jus- tice, and temporal order in the Homeric epic. Keywords Homer, Iliad , oath, curses, exôleia , ancestral fault, inherited guilt Delayed generational punishment, what the Greeks called ‘ancestral fault’, was a distinct idea within Greek culture. 1) Th e theme of children punished by the gods for the crimes http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mnemosyne Brill

The Poetics of exôleia in Homer

Mnemosyne, Volume 63 (3): 353 – Jan 1, 2010

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/the-poetics-of-ex-leia-in-homer-cbh6n9Amqf
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2010 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0026-7074
eISSN
1568-525X
D.O.I.
10.1163/156852510X456156
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2010 DOI: 10.1163/156852510X456156 Mnemosyne 63 (2010) 353-380 brill.nl/mnem Th e Poetics of exôleia in Homer Renaud Gagné University of Cambridge, Faculty of Classics, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge CB3 9DA, UK rg404@cam.ac.uk Received: September 2008; accepted: November 2008 Abstract Th e notion of delayed generational punishment, or ancestral fault, has a long his- tory in Greek literature. Th e identifi cation of its earliest attestations in the Archaic period is contested, especially its presence in Homeric poetry. Th is paper aims to show that delayed generational punishment does indeed appear in Homer, where it is, however, confi ned to one context: the great oath of exôleia of Iliad 3.298-301 and 4.155-65. Th e institutional and ritual context of the generational oath is essential to understanding this earliest Greek attestation of ancestral fault, and making sense of the idea’s larger signifi cance for narrative perspective, divine jus- tice, and temporal order in the Homeric epic. Keywords Homer, Iliad , oath, curses, exôleia , ancestral fault, inherited guilt Delayed generational punishment, what the Greeks called ‘ancestral fault’, was a distinct idea within Greek culture. 1) Th e theme of children punished by the gods for the crimes

Journal

MnemosyneBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2010

Keywords: ancestral fault; Iliad; inherited guilt; exôleia; Homer; curses; oath

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off