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The Philosopher-Historian as Cartographer: Mapping History with Michel Foucault1

The Philosopher-Historian as Cartographer: Mapping History with Michel Foucault1 31 The Philosopher-Historian as Cartographer: Mapping History with Michel Foucault1 THOMAS R. FLYNN Emory University and Institute for Advanced Study The historian who sits in Philip II's chair and reads his papers finds himself transported into a strange one-dimensional world, a world of strong passions certainly, blind like any other living world, our own included, and unconscious to the deeper realities of history, of the running waters on which our frail barks are tossed like cockle-shells. A dangerous world, but one whose direction can only be discerned by watching them over long periods of time. Resounding events are often only momentary outbursts, surface manifestations of these larger movements and explicable only in terms of them. - Fernand Braudel, Preface to The Mediterranean and the Mediterranean World in the Age of Philip II, Vol. I The map is not the territory - Alfred Korzybski, Science and Insanity By now it is a commonplace that Foucault is a spatializing thinker. Even if he had not admitted it, the multiplicity of spatial metaphors that punctuate his writing, the numerous tables and geometrical figures (axes, diagonals, circles, triads, quadrilaterals and the like) that appear at crucial junctures in his thought would have http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

The Philosopher-Historian as Cartographer: Mapping History with Michel Foucault1

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 29 (1): 31 – Jan 1, 1999

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1999 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916499X00037
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

31 The Philosopher-Historian as Cartographer: Mapping History with Michel Foucault1 THOMAS R. FLYNN Emory University and Institute for Advanced Study The historian who sits in Philip II's chair and reads his papers finds himself transported into a strange one-dimensional world, a world of strong passions certainly, blind like any other living world, our own included, and unconscious to the deeper realities of history, of the running waters on which our frail barks are tossed like cockle-shells. A dangerous world, but one whose direction can only be discerned by watching them over long periods of time. Resounding events are often only momentary outbursts, surface manifestations of these larger movements and explicable only in terms of them. - Fernand Braudel, Preface to The Mediterranean and the Mediterranean World in the Age of Philip II, Vol. I The map is not the territory - Alfred Korzybski, Science and Insanity By now it is a commonplace that Foucault is a spatializing thinker. Even if he had not admitted it, the multiplicity of spatial metaphors that punctuate his writing, the numerous tables and geometrical figures (axes, diagonals, circles, triads, quadrilaterals and the like) that appear at crucial junctures in his thought would have

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1999

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