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The Parliamentary Assembly of the Mediterranean and Its Contribution to Democracy Promotion and Crisis Management

The Parliamentary Assembly of the Mediterranean and Its Contribution to Democracy Promotion and... One of the main functions of international parliamentary institutions ( ipi s) consists of conducting parallel diplomatic relations, known as parliamentary diplomacy, especially in the fields of peace-building, crisis management and democracy promotion. The effectiveness of this form of so-called ‘parliamentarization’ of international relations is often called into question, and can only be judged through systematic empirical work. This article aims at contributing to this debate by exploring the parliamentary diplomacy activities performed by one of the most prominent parliamentary actors in Euro–Mediterranean relations: the Parliamentary Assembly of the Mediterranean ( pam ). What kinds of tools has pam adopted to implement its parliamentary diplomacy function? What is the impact of pam ’s parliamentary diplomacy? The article considers the following elements: legal and policy instruments; institutional features; functions performed while in session; activities directly addressing the national level; and parliamentary diplomacy as such. The period encompassed by the analysis ranges from 2006 to 2014. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Hague Journal of Diplomacy Brill

The Parliamentary Assembly of the Mediterranean and Its Contribution to Democracy Promotion and Crisis Management

The Hague Journal of Diplomacy , Volume 11 (2-3): 292 – Mar 11, 2016

The Parliamentary Assembly of the Mediterranean and Its Contribution to Democracy Promotion and Crisis Management


Introduction It is widely recognized that the Mediterranean is one of the world’s least structured regions in terms of intergovernmental regional cooperation. 1 Indeed, despite the growing number of initiatives launched since the mid-1970s by external political actors, such as the European Union ( eu ), United Nations ( un ), Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe ( osce ), North Atlantic Treaty Organization ( nato ), Council of Europe and the United States ( us ), with a view to promoting economic, political and scientific cooperation, the level of intra-regional institution-building has remained rather low. 2 One of the most ambitious projects in this area, namely the Euro–Mediterranean Partnership (since 2008, the Union for the Mediterranean), 3 is generally regarded in the literature as falling short of fulfilling its main objectives as originally set out in 1995 in Barcelona. Roberto Aliboni identifies three main factors accounting for this low level of institutional development. 4 First, as already mentioned, the main political (and cultural) initiatives in the Mediterranean are taken by external actors; as a consequence, the Mediterranean basin remains a ‘border’ and not a ‘centre’ in itself. Second, the Mediterranean countries do not constitute a ‘security complex’; 5 they have different security agendas, since the factors that affect South–South security have little to do with those affecting North–South security. Finally, great economic gaps exist between countries in the north and the south of the basin, because of very different political and institutional regimes. However, in contrast to this weak intra-regional intergovernmental institutional framework, non-governmental and less traditional forms of cooperation and diplomacy seem to be developing at a more robust pace. Already in 2007, Zlatko Šabič and Ana Bojinovic identified particularly dynamic growth in...
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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1871-1901
eISSN
1871-191X
DOI
10.1163/1871191X-12341331
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

One of the main functions of international parliamentary institutions ( ipi s) consists of conducting parallel diplomatic relations, known as parliamentary diplomacy, especially in the fields of peace-building, crisis management and democracy promotion. The effectiveness of this form of so-called ‘parliamentarization’ of international relations is often called into question, and can only be judged through systematic empirical work. This article aims at contributing to this debate by exploring the parliamentary diplomacy activities performed by one of the most prominent parliamentary actors in Euro–Mediterranean relations: the Parliamentary Assembly of the Mediterranean ( pam ). What kinds of tools has pam adopted to implement its parliamentary diplomacy function? What is the impact of pam ’s parliamentary diplomacy? The article considers the following elements: legal and policy instruments; institutional features; functions performed while in session; activities directly addressing the national level; and parliamentary diplomacy as such. The period encompassed by the analysis ranges from 2006 to 2014.

Journal

The Hague Journal of DiplomacyBrill

Published: Mar 11, 2016

Keywords: Parliamentary Assembly of the Mediterranean ( pam ); parliamentary diplomacy; crisis management; democracy promotion

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