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The “New” Multilateralism of the Twenty-First Century

The “New” Multilateralism of the Twenty-First Century Global Governance 17 (2011), 299–310 GLOBAL INSIGHTS The “New” Multilateralism of the Twenty-First Century Fen Osler Hampson and Paul Heinbecker OUR UNIPOLAR WORLD IS PASSING INTO HISTORY, AS THE ECONOMIC CENTER OF gravity shifts eastward and southward and new centers of power emerge. Our international governance systems and institutions, constructed out of the ruins of World War II and the Great Depression, have been steadily lagging the steep- ening curve of change. Meanwhile, as the world struggles with the aftershocks of the global financial and economic crisis, terrorism, transnational crime and drug trafficking, climate change, food security and energy prices, the Arab Awakening, Japan’s triple crises, failing and fragile states, the dangers of nu- clear proliferation, and so forth, the virtues of multilateral cooperation are being rediscovered. Many see renewed merit in pooling national sovereignty in co- operative institutional arrangements. At the same time, the preeminent power in the international system, the United States, burdened by debt, hobbled by in- ternal divisions, newly conscious of its limits, led by a president whose forma- tive years are more North-South than East-West, is itself putting greater stock in partnership and multilateral cooperation. In response to this unprecedented pace and scope of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-01703003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 17 (2011), 299–310 GLOBAL INSIGHTS The “New” Multilateralism of the Twenty-First Century Fen Osler Hampson and Paul Heinbecker OUR UNIPOLAR WORLD IS PASSING INTO HISTORY, AS THE ECONOMIC CENTER OF gravity shifts eastward and southward and new centers of power emerge. Our international governance systems and institutions, constructed out of the ruins of World War II and the Great Depression, have been steadily lagging the steep- ening curve of change. Meanwhile, as the world struggles with the aftershocks of the global financial and economic crisis, terrorism, transnational crime and drug trafficking, climate change, food security and energy prices, the Arab Awakening, Japan’s triple crises, failing and fragile states, the dangers of nu- clear proliferation, and so forth, the virtues of multilateral cooperation are being rediscovered. Many see renewed merit in pooling national sovereignty in co- operative institutional arrangements. At the same time, the preeminent power in the international system, the United States, burdened by debt, hobbled by in- ternal divisions, newly conscious of its limits, led by a president whose forma- tive years are more North-South than East-West, is itself putting greater stock in partnership and multilateral cooperation. In response to this unprecedented pace and scope of

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 12, 2011

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