The Moral Purpose of the Human Body A Reading of Timaeus 69-72

The Moral Purpose of the Human Body A Reading of Timaeus 69-72 The Moral Purpose of the Human Body A Reading of Timaeus 69-72 1 CARLOS STEEL In a poem dating from the twelfth century, ÒFons Philosophiae,Ó Plato is represented as the great master in Physics, sitting opposite Aristotle, the authority on matters of Logic. 2 This poetical representation corresponds to the knowledge that scholars had at that time of both philosophers. Of Aristotle only the logical works were available in translation, whereas Plato was known through one dialogue, the Timaeus , in the incomplete Latin translation with commentary by Calcidius. Introducing PlatoÕs phi- losophy by starting from the Timaeus might indeed lead to the distorted view that Plato was primarily interested in physics, when in fact the intent of his whole philosophical project was always ethical-political. It is from that ethical perspective that the Timaeus too must be understood, as I shall argue. To be sure, one Ž nds in this dialogue an account of the constitu- tion of the physical world, and Plato treats here the great topics of the natural sciences: astronomy, of course, and mathematics, but also ana- tomy, physiology, biology, medicine, optics, and chemistry. In all of those domains he proves to be something of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Phronesis Brill

The Moral Purpose of the Human Body A Reading of Timaeus 69-72

Phronesis , Volume 46 (2): 105 – Jan 1, 2001

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/the-moral-purpose-of-the-human-body-a-reading-of-timaeus-69-72-MTEFVh80e7
Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
© 2001 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0031-8868
eISSN
1568-5284
D.O.I.
10.1163/156852801753733240
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Moral Purpose of the Human Body A Reading of Timaeus 69-72 1 CARLOS STEEL In a poem dating from the twelfth century, ÒFons Philosophiae,Ó Plato is represented as the great master in Physics, sitting opposite Aristotle, the authority on matters of Logic. 2 This poetical representation corresponds to the knowledge that scholars had at that time of both philosophers. Of Aristotle only the logical works were available in translation, whereas Plato was known through one dialogue, the Timaeus , in the incomplete Latin translation with commentary by Calcidius. Introducing PlatoÕs phi- losophy by starting from the Timaeus might indeed lead to the distorted view that Plato was primarily interested in physics, when in fact the intent of his whole philosophical project was always ethical-political. It is from that ethical perspective that the Timaeus too must be understood, as I shall argue. To be sure, one Ž nds in this dialogue an account of the constitu- tion of the physical world, and Plato treats here the great topics of the natural sciences: astronomy, of course, and mathematics, but also ana- tomy, physiology, biology, medicine, optics, and chemistry. In all of those domains he proves to be something of

Journal

PhronesisBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2001

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off