Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Little Human and The Daughter-in-law: Invisibles as Seen Through the Eyes of Different Kinds of People

The Little Human and The Daughter-in-law: Invisibles as Seen Through the Eyes of Different Kinds... AbstractThis chapter focuses on two versions of a single story collected from North-west and North-east Mongolia. The story concerns a daughter-in-law’s relationship with ‘little humans’ (jijig hün) at her in-laws’ house. Although similar in their thematic content, the two stories differ in their endings. In the example from North-west Mongolia, the daughter-in-law successfully rids her in-laws ’house of a little human allowing them to prosper. In the example from North-east Mongolia, the daughter-in-law mistakenly throws a little human into the fire, causing her natal family to perish. At first sight, this divergence could be seen as reflective of the kind of perspectival difference established between a predominantly Buddhist ontology in Western Mongolia and a predominantly shamanist ontology in Eastern Mongolia. But the stories resist being viewed as allegorical texts by which to extract information concerning received ontological differences. Regardless of East/West differences, laypeople across all of Mongolia have varied relationships with aspects of the normally invisible world. We argue that, rather than establish ontological species-specific differentiations, such relations point to shifting scales of different ‘kinds’ of people in Mongolia. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Inner Asia Brill

The Little Human and The Daughter-in-law: Invisibles as Seen Through the Eyes of Different Kinds of People

Inner Asia , Volume 9 (2): 18 – Jan 1, 2007

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/the-little-human-and-the-daughter-in-law-invisibles-as-seen-through-n8ybNp4zdk
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1464-8172
eISSN
2210-5018
DOI
10.1163/146481707793646476
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThis chapter focuses on two versions of a single story collected from North-west and North-east Mongolia. The story concerns a daughter-in-law’s relationship with ‘little humans’ (jijig hün) at her in-laws’ house. Although similar in their thematic content, the two stories differ in their endings. In the example from North-west Mongolia, the daughter-in-law successfully rids her in-laws ’house of a little human allowing them to prosper. In the example from North-east Mongolia, the daughter-in-law mistakenly throws a little human into the fire, causing her natal family to perish. At first sight, this divergence could be seen as reflective of the kind of perspectival difference established between a predominantly Buddhist ontology in Western Mongolia and a predominantly shamanist ontology in Eastern Mongolia. But the stories resist being viewed as allegorical texts by which to extract information concerning received ontological differences. Regardless of East/West differences, laypeople across all of Mongolia have varied relationships with aspects of the normally invisible world. We argue that, rather than establish ontological species-specific differentiations, such relations point to shifting scales of different ‘kinds’ of people in Mongolia.

Journal

Inner AsiaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2007

There are no references for this article.