The Larval Development of Chthamalus Dentatus Krauss (Cirripedia) From South Africa

The Larval Development of Chthamalus Dentatus Krauss (Cirripedia) From South Africa THE LARVAL DEVELOPMENT OF CHTHAMALUS DENTATUS KRAUSS (CIRRIPEDIA) FROM SOUTH AFRICA BY Y. ACHITUV Department of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52 100, Israel INTRODUCTION The biology of many adult cirripedes is relatively well documented, but less is known about their larval biology. The larval stages of about 50 species of barnacles have been described, most of them from the Northern Hemisphere. Recognition of the free swimming nauplius stages of cirripedes is essential for studies of plankton ecology. Free swimming stages of barnacles can be used as indicators for the origin and movement of plankton as the adults have a distinct geographical distribution. The pattern of larval development in intertidal cir- ripedes is consistent; the adult barnacles release the free swimming stage I nauplii which undergo 6 consecutive moults to produce 5 additional nauplius stages and the cypris. The non-feeding cyprids undergo settlement and metamorphosis to a juvenile. Exceptions have been found only in deep-water cirripedes and in parasitic cirripedes. Sandison (1954) described the nauplius stages of most of the common South African barnacles based on nauplii col- lected from plankton hauls. Only the first two stages of Tetraclita serrata Darwin, 1854, and Chthamalus dentatus Krauss, 1848, were http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Crustaceana Brill

The Larval Development of Chthamalus Dentatus Krauss (Cirripedia) From South Africa

Crustaceana, Volume 51 (3): 259 – Jan 1, 1986

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1986 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0011-216x
eISSN
1568-5403
D.O.I.
10.1163/156854086X00412
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE LARVAL DEVELOPMENT OF CHTHAMALUS DENTATUS KRAUSS (CIRRIPEDIA) FROM SOUTH AFRICA BY Y. ACHITUV Department of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52 100, Israel INTRODUCTION The biology of many adult cirripedes is relatively well documented, but less is known about their larval biology. The larval stages of about 50 species of barnacles have been described, most of them from the Northern Hemisphere. Recognition of the free swimming nauplius stages of cirripedes is essential for studies of plankton ecology. Free swimming stages of barnacles can be used as indicators for the origin and movement of plankton as the adults have a distinct geographical distribution. The pattern of larval development in intertidal cir- ripedes is consistent; the adult barnacles release the free swimming stage I nauplii which undergo 6 consecutive moults to produce 5 additional nauplius stages and the cypris. The non-feeding cyprids undergo settlement and metamorphosis to a juvenile. Exceptions have been found only in deep-water cirripedes and in parasitic cirripedes. Sandison (1954) described the nauplius stages of most of the common South African barnacles based on nauplii col- lected from plankton hauls. Only the first two stages of Tetraclita serrata Darwin, 1854, and Chthamalus dentatus Krauss, 1848, were

Journal

CrustaceanaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1986

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