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The “Knowledge Bank” and the Global Development Network

The “Knowledge Bank” and the Global Development Network Global Governance 9 (2003), 43–61 The “Knowledge Bank” and the Global Development Network Diane Stone here are many research networks in existence but few so grand in design as the Global Development Network (GDN). Why has the T World Bank devoted so much effort and so many resources to think tanks? Some of the answers lie in broader objectives of the World Bank to become the “knowledge bank.” The GDN represents one program to operationalize this policy discourse of knowledge. The network is designed to allow greater scope for “home-grown” policy, information sharing, and enhanced research capacity in and between developing countries for the coproduction of local, regional, and global knowledge. The World Bank and other sponsors of the network are promoting the creation and distribution of a global public good—knowledge. Stimulating the supply of both the quantity and quality of policy-relevant research aids the transmission of international “best practices.” Such laudable aspirations have been welcomed within the develop- ment studies community. Yet there are also concerns about the uncriti- cal view of knowledge and the assumptions about how that knowledge is utilized. There is a rationalist tendency within the GDN that portrays (scientific) research as independent from its http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

The “Knowledge Bank” and the Global Development Network

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-00901005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 9 (2003), 43–61 The “Knowledge Bank” and the Global Development Network Diane Stone here are many research networks in existence but few so grand in design as the Global Development Network (GDN). Why has the T World Bank devoted so much effort and so many resources to think tanks? Some of the answers lie in broader objectives of the World Bank to become the “knowledge bank.” The GDN represents one program to operationalize this policy discourse of knowledge. The network is designed to allow greater scope for “home-grown” policy, information sharing, and enhanced research capacity in and between developing countries for the coproduction of local, regional, and global knowledge. The World Bank and other sponsors of the network are promoting the creation and distribution of a global public good—knowledge. Stimulating the supply of both the quantity and quality of policy-relevant research aids the transmission of international “best practices.” Such laudable aspirations have been welcomed within the develop- ment studies community. Yet there are also concerns about the uncriti- cal view of knowledge and the assumptions about how that knowledge is utilized. There is a rationalist tendency within the GDN that portrays (scientific) research as independent from its

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 3, 2003

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