The Kinship Network among French Canadians1

The Kinship Network among French Canadians1 The Kinship Network among French Canadians1 RALPH PIDDINGTON The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand PART I 1. Introduction THIS essay is divided into two parts. Part I gives the general conclusions of my research in St. Boniface in 1962. Part II contains documentation, consisting mainly of statements by informants, as well as some supplementary notes. The documents are numbered for ease of reference. Sociological studies of the functions of kinship have usually concentrated attention on how these functions affect the lives of local communities. Indeed this is the only type of study possible in many primitive societies characterised, until recently, by partial or complete isolation. Within such societies kinship bonds tend to form a closed system of human relations within a limited territory. There are, of course, partial exceptions to this statement, for example inter-tribal kinship relationships in aboriginal Australia. But it remains true that most studies in kinship have of necessity placed primary emphasis on kinship relations correlated with regular and often daily face-to-face contacts within a limited geographical area. The phenomena of geographical mobility, urbanisation and industrialisation in modern society call for a wider approach. It is necessary to ask what happens when kinsmen become http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Comparative Sociology (in 2002 continued as Comparative Sociology) Brill

The Kinship Network among French Canadians1

International Journal of Comparative Sociology (in 2002 continued as Comparative Sociology) , Volume 6 (1): 145 – Jan 1, 1965

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1965 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0020-7152
eISSN
1745-2554
D.O.I.
10.1163/156854265X00233
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Kinship Network among French Canadians1 RALPH PIDDINGTON The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand PART I 1. Introduction THIS essay is divided into two parts. Part I gives the general conclusions of my research in St. Boniface in 1962. Part II contains documentation, consisting mainly of statements by informants, as well as some supplementary notes. The documents are numbered for ease of reference. Sociological studies of the functions of kinship have usually concentrated attention on how these functions affect the lives of local communities. Indeed this is the only type of study possible in many primitive societies characterised, until recently, by partial or complete isolation. Within such societies kinship bonds tend to form a closed system of human relations within a limited territory. There are, of course, partial exceptions to this statement, for example inter-tribal kinship relationships in aboriginal Australia. But it remains true that most studies in kinship have of necessity placed primary emphasis on kinship relations correlated with regular and often daily face-to-face contacts within a limited geographical area. The phenomena of geographical mobility, urbanisation and industrialisation in modern society call for a wider approach. It is necessary to ask what happens when kinsmen become

Journal

International Journal of Comparative Sociology (in 2002 continued as Comparative Sociology)Brill

Published: Jan 1, 1965

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