The Jurisdictional Regime of the International Criminal Court (Part II, Articles 11--19)

The Jurisdictional Regime of the International Criminal Court (Part II, Articles 11--19) Morten Bergsmo* The Jurisdictional Régime of the International Criminal Court (Part II, Articles 11–19) The Secretary-General hailed the adoption of the Statute of the International Criminal Court in Rome on 17 July 1998 as a ‘gift of hope to future generations, and a giant step forward in the march towards universal human rights and the rule of law’, as an ‘achievement which, only a few years ago, nobody would have thought possible’. 1 It is true that the prospect of a functioning International Criminal Court 2 does provide hope to those who consider the international enforcement of international humanitarian law significant to the legitimacy of international law and its role in international rela- tions. It is also true that the criminalization of violations of Article 3 common to the four Geneva Conventions for the Protection of Victims of War of 12 August 1949 and several provisions of Additional Protocol II of 8 June 1977 applicable to internal armed conflicts signals a certain convergence of international humanitarian law and human rights law, and lends strength to the human rights project of the United Nations. Moreover, it is likely that a functioning ICC will have a deterrent effect 3 and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice Brill

The Jurisdictional Regime of the International Criminal Court (Part II, Articles 11--19)

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1998 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0928-9569
eISSN
1571-8174
D.O.I.
10.1163/15718179820518601
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Morten Bergsmo* The Jurisdictional Régime of the International Criminal Court (Part II, Articles 11–19) The Secretary-General hailed the adoption of the Statute of the International Criminal Court in Rome on 17 July 1998 as a ‘gift of hope to future generations, and a giant step forward in the march towards universal human rights and the rule of law’, as an ‘achievement which, only a few years ago, nobody would have thought possible’. 1 It is true that the prospect of a functioning International Criminal Court 2 does provide hope to those who consider the international enforcement of international humanitarian law significant to the legitimacy of international law and its role in international rela- tions. It is also true that the criminalization of violations of Article 3 common to the four Geneva Conventions for the Protection of Victims of War of 12 August 1949 and several provisions of Additional Protocol II of 8 June 1977 applicable to internal armed conflicts signals a certain convergence of international humanitarian law and human rights law, and lends strength to the human rights project of the United Nations. Moreover, it is likely that a functioning ICC will have a deterrent effect 3 and

Journal

European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal JusticeBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1998

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