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The John Holmes Memorial Lecture: Global Governance in a Copernican World

The John Holmes Memorial Lecture: Global Governance in a Copernican World Global Governance 18 (2012), 133–148 GLOBAL INSIGHTS The John Holmes Memorial Lecture: Global Governance in a Copernican World Bruce W. Jentleson FOR ALL THE DIPPING POLITICAL SCIENCE DOES INTO SUCH DISCIPLINES AS economics, physics, and sociology for our theory and metaphors, it is (as Carl Sagan no doubt would have agreed) astronomy that provides the best concep- tualization of the twenty-first-century international system. The Cold War sys- tem of the second half of the twentieth century was a lot like the ancient philosopher-astronomer Ptolemy’s theory of the universe. For Ptolemy, the earth was at the center with the other planets, indeed all the other celestial bod- ies, revolving around it. And so too was the United States at the center of the Cold War world. It was the wielder of power, the economic engine, the bastion of free world ideology. When the Cold War ended with the demise and defeat of the Soviet Union, US centrality seemed even more defining; it was the sole surviving superpower. The US economy was driving globalization. Democ- racy was spreading all over. The world seemed even more Ptolemaic. Not anymore. The twenty-first-century world is more like the theory of the universe developed in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

The John Holmes Memorial Lecture: Global Governance in a Copernican World

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-01802001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 18 (2012), 133–148 GLOBAL INSIGHTS The John Holmes Memorial Lecture: Global Governance in a Copernican World Bruce W. Jentleson FOR ALL THE DIPPING POLITICAL SCIENCE DOES INTO SUCH DISCIPLINES AS economics, physics, and sociology for our theory and metaphors, it is (as Carl Sagan no doubt would have agreed) astronomy that provides the best concep- tualization of the twenty-first-century international system. The Cold War sys- tem of the second half of the twentieth century was a lot like the ancient philosopher-astronomer Ptolemy’s theory of the universe. For Ptolemy, the earth was at the center with the other planets, indeed all the other celestial bod- ies, revolving around it. And so too was the United States at the center of the Cold War world. It was the wielder of power, the economic engine, the bastion of free world ideology. When the Cold War ended with the demise and defeat of the Soviet Union, US centrality seemed even more defining; it was the sole surviving superpower. The US economy was driving globalization. Democ- racy was spreading all over. The world seemed even more Ptolemaic. Not anymore. The twenty-first-century world is more like the theory of the universe developed in

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 12, 2012

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