Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Japan―Singapore Economic Partnership Agreement

The Japan―Singapore Economic Partnership Agreement I. INTRODUCTION In 1990, the Malaysian Prime Minister, Dr Mahathir bin Mohamad proposed an East Asian Economic Caucus (EAEC) comprising the then six Members of the Association of South-East Asian Nations1 (ASEAN), Cambodia, the Lao Peoples' Democratic Republic, Myanmar, Vietnam, Japan, China and South Korea. The EAEC was intended to be an exclusive economic grouping among Asian countries that excluded those in the region that were racially non-Asian. The proposal was strongly opposed by the United States, Australia and New Zealand, ostensibly because it would undermine the Asia Pacific Economic Co-operation'- (AnEC) Forum which they supported. Response from the rest of Asia was lukewarm. Although placed as the effective leader of the economic bloc, Japan's reaction was ambivalent, as it did not relish the prospect of having to constantly navigate its relationships between East Asia and the United States. It was not until 1995 that the rest of AsEnN unanimously endorsed the concept. At the ASEAN Foreign Ministers meeting in Brunei, Members affirmed their support for the EAEC. However, the East Asian economic grouping remained unattainable until 1997, when the Asian financial crisis brought about major economic and political changes in Asia. During the period of the crisis, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World Investment and Trade Brill

The Japan―Singapore Economic Partnership Agreement

Journal of World Investment and Trade , Volume 3 (3): 27 – Jan 1, 2002

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/the-japan-singapore-economic-partnership-agreement-yZmbzqa0xn
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1660-7112
eISSN
2211-9000
DOI
10.1163/221190002X00076
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

I. INTRODUCTION In 1990, the Malaysian Prime Minister, Dr Mahathir bin Mohamad proposed an East Asian Economic Caucus (EAEC) comprising the then six Members of the Association of South-East Asian Nations1 (ASEAN), Cambodia, the Lao Peoples' Democratic Republic, Myanmar, Vietnam, Japan, China and South Korea. The EAEC was intended to be an exclusive economic grouping among Asian countries that excluded those in the region that were racially non-Asian. The proposal was strongly opposed by the United States, Australia and New Zealand, ostensibly because it would undermine the Asia Pacific Economic Co-operation'- (AnEC) Forum which they supported. Response from the rest of Asia was lukewarm. Although placed as the effective leader of the economic bloc, Japan's reaction was ambivalent, as it did not relish the prospect of having to constantly navigate its relationships between East Asia and the United States. It was not until 1995 that the rest of AsEnN unanimously endorsed the concept. At the ASEAN Foreign Ministers meeting in Brunei, Members affirmed their support for the EAEC. However, the East Asian economic grouping remained unattainable until 1997, when the Asian financial crisis brought about major economic and political changes in Asia. During the period of the crisis,

Journal

Journal of World Investment and TradeBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2002

There are no references for this article.