The Islamic Perception of the Use of Force in the Contemporary World

The Islamic Perception of the Use of Force in the Contemporary World Said Mahmoudi 55 Journal of the History of International Law 7 : 55–68, 2005. ©2005 Koninklijke Brill NV. Printed in the Netherlands. The Islamic Perception of the Use of Force in the Contemporary World Said Mahmoudi* I. Introduction When speaking of Islamic perceptions of the use of force, particularly in the current phase of international relations, we should remember that there is no unified percep- tion among Islamic law experts or politicians in Islamic countries. It is not unusual that Islamic schools of jurisprudence have different interpretations of the provisions of primary sources of Islamic law, particularly verses of the Koran. Nor do “Islamic countries” constitute a homogenous group of States; they merely have Islam as the dominant religion. Besides, depending on how one defines “use of force” and its per- petrators, views are not necessarily limited to the official. What individuals and groups perceive may also bear on the assessment of the actual status of the law. The place and role of Islam in the constitutions of Islamic countries are very diver- gent. 1 Consequently, the degree to which Islam influences and shapes national policies in these countries can vary considerably, as witness e.g. , Bosnia and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the History of International Law / Revue d'histoire du droit international Brill

The Islamic Perception of the Use of Force in the Contemporary World

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2005 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1388-199X
eISSN
1571-8050
D.O.I.
10.1163/1571805054545091
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Said Mahmoudi 55 Journal of the History of International Law 7 : 55–68, 2005. ©2005 Koninklijke Brill NV. Printed in the Netherlands. The Islamic Perception of the Use of Force in the Contemporary World Said Mahmoudi* I. Introduction When speaking of Islamic perceptions of the use of force, particularly in the current phase of international relations, we should remember that there is no unified percep- tion among Islamic law experts or politicians in Islamic countries. It is not unusual that Islamic schools of jurisprudence have different interpretations of the provisions of primary sources of Islamic law, particularly verses of the Koran. Nor do “Islamic countries” constitute a homogenous group of States; they merely have Islam as the dominant religion. Besides, depending on how one defines “use of force” and its per- petrators, views are not necessarily limited to the official. What individuals and groups perceive may also bear on the assessment of the actual status of the law. The place and role of Islam in the constitutions of Islamic countries are very diver- gent. 1 Consequently, the degree to which Islam influences and shapes national policies in these countries can vary considerably, as witness e.g. , Bosnia and

Journal

Journal of the History of International Law / Revue d'histoire du droit internationalBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2005

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