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The International Regulation of IPRS in a TRIPS and TRIPS―plus World

The International Regulation of IPRS in a TRIPS and TRIPS―plus World "Uno avulso norl deficit alter." "When one is torn away, another succeeds." - Virgil, The Aeneid Any discussion on trade-related intellectual property agreements is far from being natural and straightforward. Unlike other trade agreements, the international regulation of intellectual property rights (Inks) ultimately deals with a unique commodity-knowledge. It is therefore subject to a set of constraints and interests that differ substantially from the "conventional" challenges of international trade agreements. Suffice it to say that while trade-liberalization agreements aim (at least in theory) to reduce the level and volume of protectionism, international intellectual property (IP) agreements aim to increase it. In recent years, researchers have found substantial evidence suggesting that since the year 2000 regional and bilateral trade agreements between developed and developing countries have tended to implement IP provisions that go beyond the World Trade Organization's Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (the TRips Agreement). Researchers also find that these so-called TRIPS-plus provisions are based on the IP standards of developed countries, primarily the United States and the European Union. However, thus far, less attention has been devoted to placing the above developments in a more general context that seeks to analyse-both theoretically and empirically-the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World Investment and Trade Brill

The International Regulation of IPRS in a TRIPS and TRIPS―plus World

Journal of World Investment and Trade , Volume 6 (3): 35 – Jan 1, 2005

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1660-7112
eISSN
2211-9000
DOI
10.1163/221190005X00154
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

"Uno avulso norl deficit alter." "When one is torn away, another succeeds." - Virgil, The Aeneid Any discussion on trade-related intellectual property agreements is far from being natural and straightforward. Unlike other trade agreements, the international regulation of intellectual property rights (Inks) ultimately deals with a unique commodity-knowledge. It is therefore subject to a set of constraints and interests that differ substantially from the "conventional" challenges of international trade agreements. Suffice it to say that while trade-liberalization agreements aim (at least in theory) to reduce the level and volume of protectionism, international intellectual property (IP) agreements aim to increase it. In recent years, researchers have found substantial evidence suggesting that since the year 2000 regional and bilateral trade agreements between developed and developing countries have tended to implement IP provisions that go beyond the World Trade Organization's Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (the TRips Agreement). Researchers also find that these so-called TRIPS-plus provisions are based on the IP standards of developed countries, primarily the United States and the European Union. However, thus far, less attention has been devoted to placing the above developments in a more general context that seeks to analyse-both theoretically and empirically-the

Journal

Journal of World Investment and TradeBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2005

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