The International Criminal Court—A <?CTRLerr type="1" mess="Doute Cars isoles avec recollage" ?>Brief Introduction

The International Criminal Court—A I. Foreword II. The Road to Rome III. The Discussion at Rome and its Outcome I. Foreword At a United Nations Conference in Rome, Italy, held from 15 June to 17 July 1998 governments overwhelmingly approved a Statute to estab- lish a permanent International Criminal Court (ICC).1 On 1 April 2002 the so-called Rome Statute received more than the required 60 ratifica- tions and entered into force on 1 July 2002.2 Located in The Hague, Netherlands, the Court consists of 18 inter- nationally respected judges3 elected for a three to nine year term, a team of investigators and a Prosecutor. It will not be part of the United Na- tions. A building has been provided by the Netherlands, and in July 2002 an Advance Team begun making practical arrangements for the Court as well as dealing with operational issues. The ICC will be capable of investigating and trying individuals ac- cused of the most serious violations of international humanitarian and human rights law, according to article 5 of the Statute, war crimes, crimes against humanity, the crime of genocide, and the crime of aggres- sion. While the crime of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes have been http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Max Planck Yearbook of United Nations Law Online Brill

The International Criminal Court—A <?CTRLerr type="1" mess="Doute Cars isoles avec recollage" ?>Brief Introduction

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Publisher
Martinus Nijhoff
Copyright
Copyright 2004 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1389-4633
eISSN
1875-7413
D.O.I.
10.1163/187574103X00068
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

I. Foreword II. The Road to Rome III. The Discussion at Rome and its Outcome I. Foreword At a United Nations Conference in Rome, Italy, held from 15 June to 17 July 1998 governments overwhelmingly approved a Statute to estab- lish a permanent International Criminal Court (ICC).1 On 1 April 2002 the so-called Rome Statute received more than the required 60 ratifica- tions and entered into force on 1 July 2002.2 Located in The Hague, Netherlands, the Court consists of 18 inter- nationally respected judges3 elected for a three to nine year term, a team of investigators and a Prosecutor. It will not be part of the United Na- tions. A building has been provided by the Netherlands, and in July 2002 an Advance Team begun making practical arrangements for the Court as well as dealing with operational issues. The ICC will be capable of investigating and trying individuals ac- cused of the most serious violations of international humanitarian and human rights law, according to article 5 of the Statute, war crimes, crimes against humanity, the crime of genocide, and the crime of aggres- sion. While the crime of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes have been

Journal

Max Planck Yearbook of United Nations Law OnlineBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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