The inter-island translocation of the New Zealand frog Leiopelma hamiltoni

The inter-island translocation of the New Zealand frog Leiopelma hamiltoni The inter-island translocation of the New Zealand frog Leiopelma hamiltoni Mandy D. Tocher 1,2 , Shirley Pledger 3 1 Science and Research Unit, Science Technology and Information Services, Department of Conservation, Private Bag 1930, Dunedin, New Zealand 2 Corresponding author; e-mail: mtocher@doc.govt.nz 3 School of Mathematical and Computing Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, P.O. Box 600, Wellington, New Zealand Abstract. Leiopelma hamiltoni from Maud Island, Marlborough Sounds, New Zealand is confined to two populations totalling approximately 19,000 individuals. In May 1997, 300 L. hamiltoni from Maud Island were translocated to nearby Motuara Island in an effort to expand their distribution and lower the risk of extinction for the species. By August 2002, 155 of the translocated frogs had been recaptured and the population contained a range of young to old frogs. Population estimates indicated the population on Motuara Island had stabilised with losses of the translocated frogs offset by new recruits. The first juvenile frog was found in January 1998, only 10 months after the translocation and 42 recruits were captured by August 2002. Although initial survival was low for the translocated frogs, survival following the initial 2-month settling-in period was high (71-100%). New recruits produced on Motuara http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Herpetology Brill

The inter-island translocation of the New Zealand frog Leiopelma hamiltoni

Applied Herpetology, Volume 2 (4): 401 – Jan 1, 2005

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2005 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1570-7539
eISSN
1570-7547
D.O.I.
10.1163/157075405774483067
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The inter-island translocation of the New Zealand frog Leiopelma hamiltoni Mandy D. Tocher 1,2 , Shirley Pledger 3 1 Science and Research Unit, Science Technology and Information Services, Department of Conservation, Private Bag 1930, Dunedin, New Zealand 2 Corresponding author; e-mail: mtocher@doc.govt.nz 3 School of Mathematical and Computing Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, P.O. Box 600, Wellington, New Zealand Abstract. Leiopelma hamiltoni from Maud Island, Marlborough Sounds, New Zealand is confined to two populations totalling approximately 19,000 individuals. In May 1997, 300 L. hamiltoni from Maud Island were translocated to nearby Motuara Island in an effort to expand their distribution and lower the risk of extinction for the species. By August 2002, 155 of the translocated frogs had been recaptured and the population contained a range of young to old frogs. Population estimates indicated the population on Motuara Island had stabilised with losses of the translocated frogs offset by new recruits. The first juvenile frog was found in January 1998, only 10 months after the translocation and 42 recruits were captured by August 2002. Although initial survival was low for the translocated frogs, survival following the initial 2-month settling-in period was high (71-100%). New recruits produced on Motuara

Journal

Applied HerpetologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2005

Keywords: CAPTURE-RECAPTURE; CONSERVATION MANAGEMENT; LEIOPELMA; NEW ZEALAND; TRANSLOCATION

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