The Influence of the Encoding Modality on Spatial Navigation for Sighted and Late-Blind People

The Influence of the Encoding Modality on Spatial Navigation for Sighted and Late-Blind People AbstractPeople usually rely on sight to encode spatial information, becoming aware of other sensory cues when deprived of vision. In the absence of vision, it has been demonstrated that physical movements and spatial descriptions can effectively provide the spatial information that is necessary for the construction of an adequate spatial mental model. However, no study has previously compared the influence of these encoding modalities on complex movements such as human spatial navigation within real room-size environments. Thus, we investigated whether the encoding of a spatial layout through verbal cues — that is, spatial description — and motor cues — that is, physical exploration of the environment — differently affect spatial navigation within a real room-size environment, by testing blindfolded sighted (Experiment 1) and late-blind (Experiment 2) participants. Our results reveal that encoding the environment through physical movement is more effective than through verbal descriptions in supporting active navigation. Thus, our findings are in line with the studies claiming that the physical exploration of an environment enhances the development of a global spatial representation and improves spatial updating. From an applied perspective, the present results suggest that it might be possible to improve the experience for visually impaired people within a new environment by allowing them to explore it. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Multisensory Research (continuation of Seeing & Perceiving from 2013) Brill

The Influence of the Encoding Modality on Spatial Navigation for Sighted and Late-Blind People

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/the-influence-of-the-encoding-modality-on-spatial-navigation-for-czwGDJ0NLA
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
2213-4794
eISSN
2213-4808
DOI
10.1163/22134808-20191431
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractPeople usually rely on sight to encode spatial information, becoming aware of other sensory cues when deprived of vision. In the absence of vision, it has been demonstrated that physical movements and spatial descriptions can effectively provide the spatial information that is necessary for the construction of an adequate spatial mental model. However, no study has previously compared the influence of these encoding modalities on complex movements such as human spatial navigation within real room-size environments. Thus, we investigated whether the encoding of a spatial layout through verbal cues — that is, spatial description — and motor cues — that is, physical exploration of the environment — differently affect spatial navigation within a real room-size environment, by testing blindfolded sighted (Experiment 1) and late-blind (Experiment 2) participants. Our results reveal that encoding the environment through physical movement is more effective than through verbal descriptions in supporting active navigation. Thus, our findings are in line with the studies claiming that the physical exploration of an environment enhances the development of a global spatial representation and improves spatial updating. From an applied perspective, the present results suggest that it might be possible to improve the experience for visually impaired people within a new environment by allowing them to explore it.

Journal

Multisensory Research (continuation of Seeing & Perceiving from 2013)Brill

Published: Feb 7, 2019

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month