The Impact of Education on Individual Modernity in Tunisia*

The Impact of Education on Individual Modernity in Tunisia* The Impact of Education on Individual Modernity in Tunisia* RICHARD SACK University of Wisconsin, Madison, U.S.A. THE process of education has long been regarded as having important outcomes other than in the purely cognitive realm usually associated with it. Traditionally, schooling has been viewed as a process whereby the pupils are imbued with the attitudes prevalent in any society and as essential in the making of a "good citizen". As Dreeben (1968) suggests, more than the "three R's" are learned at school and, "the social experiences available to pupils in schools, by virtue of the nature and sequence of their structural arrangements, provide opportunities for children to learn norms characteristic of several facets of adult public life, occupation being but one (p. 65)." The most prevalent view of the role of education in the processes of devel- opment and modernization is centered around those aspects of the educative process which prepare individuals for the occupational world. Education is viewed as having its greatest impact as a supplier of much needed skills to a developing economy (Anderson, 1968). Recently, in the literature on devel- opment, there has been greater recognition that the importance of education for development may go http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Comparative Sociology (in 2002 continued as Comparative Sociology) Brill

The Impact of Education on Individual Modernity in Tunisia*

International Journal of Comparative Sociology (in 2002 continued as Comparative Sociology), Volume 14 (3-4): 245 – Jan 1, 1973

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1973 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0020-7152
eISSN
1745-2554
D.O.I.
10.1163/156854273X00063
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Impact of Education on Individual Modernity in Tunisia* RICHARD SACK University of Wisconsin, Madison, U.S.A. THE process of education has long been regarded as having important outcomes other than in the purely cognitive realm usually associated with it. Traditionally, schooling has been viewed as a process whereby the pupils are imbued with the attitudes prevalent in any society and as essential in the making of a "good citizen". As Dreeben (1968) suggests, more than the "three R's" are learned at school and, "the social experiences available to pupils in schools, by virtue of the nature and sequence of their structural arrangements, provide opportunities for children to learn norms characteristic of several facets of adult public life, occupation being but one (p. 65)." The most prevalent view of the role of education in the processes of devel- opment and modernization is centered around those aspects of the educative process which prepare individuals for the occupational world. Education is viewed as having its greatest impact as a supplier of much needed skills to a developing economy (Anderson, 1968). Recently, in the literature on devel- opment, there has been greater recognition that the importance of education for development may go

Journal

International Journal of Comparative Sociology (in 2002 continued as Comparative Sociology)Brill

Published: Jan 1, 1973

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