The Growth Response of Artemia Salina (L.) To Various Feeding Regimes 1 )

The Growth Response of Artemia Salina (L.) To Various Feeding Regimes 1 ) THE GROWTH RESPONSE OF ARTEMIA SALINA (L.) TO VARIOUS FEEDING REGIMES 1 ) BY DAVID T. MASON Zoology Department, University of California, Davis, U.S.A. The experiments reported here were undertaken to estimate both the gross efficiency of Artemia salina and some of the quantitative relations between early growth and food. The ubiquitous brine shrimp plays a predominant role in the plankton of many saline lakes and impoundments which, because of their rela- tively simple trophic structure, are of especial interest to the ecologist. The term "gross efficiency" is used in this paper as a measure of the amount of growth produced by a given quantity of food which the animal removes from its environment; the two approaches used here yielded "per cent efficiency" figures based upon weights and upon radioactivity after C14-labeled food intake. The experimental design also permitted evaluation of the effects of containing volume, concentration, and total amount of food offered, upon the growth of the shrimp. The quantitative relationship between food and growth of aquatic crustaceans is not well documented. The experiments of Clarke & Bonnet (1939) on Calanus fimnarchicus (Gunnerus) indicated an optimum food concentration, but their index of growth seems quantitatively inadequate. Marshall http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Crustaceana Brill

The Growth Response of Artemia Salina (L.) To Various Feeding Regimes 1 )

Crustaceana , Volume 5 (2): 138 – Jan 1, 1963

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Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
© 1963 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0011-216x
eISSN
1568-5403
D.O.I.
10.1163/156854063X00417
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE GROWTH RESPONSE OF ARTEMIA SALINA (L.) TO VARIOUS FEEDING REGIMES 1 ) BY DAVID T. MASON Zoology Department, University of California, Davis, U.S.A. The experiments reported here were undertaken to estimate both the gross efficiency of Artemia salina and some of the quantitative relations between early growth and food. The ubiquitous brine shrimp plays a predominant role in the plankton of many saline lakes and impoundments which, because of their rela- tively simple trophic structure, are of especial interest to the ecologist. The term "gross efficiency" is used in this paper as a measure of the amount of growth produced by a given quantity of food which the animal removes from its environment; the two approaches used here yielded "per cent efficiency" figures based upon weights and upon radioactivity after C14-labeled food intake. The experimental design also permitted evaluation of the effects of containing volume, concentration, and total amount of food offered, upon the growth of the shrimp. The quantitative relationship between food and growth of aquatic crustaceans is not well documented. The experiments of Clarke & Bonnet (1939) on Calanus fimnarchicus (Gunnerus) indicated an optimum food concentration, but their index of growth seems quantitatively inadequate. Marshall

Journal

CrustaceanaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1963

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