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The Grit and Grist of Thinking the Unthinkable House

The Grit and Grist of Thinking the Unthinkable House 12 The Grit and Grist of Thinking the Unthinkable House BEN NICHOLSON Illinois Institute of Technology I. Thinking the Unthinkable The idea of a franchise is an intriguing one because its life rotates about a name. Wherever the name goes an entourage of buildings, desks, stoves, storage bins, and countertops follow-to help make the name substantial. The Appliance House is a franchise of this kind: its name goes to all manner of places. Yet why does it commandeer this particular name? The Appliance House is the direct heir to the sort of house that is endangered by scores of little and big devices that are scattered throughout it. The appliance is examined for its potential selfhood and the unquanti- fiable values that are installed in its very constitution. Sears Roebuck, a firm synonymous with small and large appliances, has a sign in one of its repair centers that describes the mythological impact that Sears has had on the modern home. It declares: "Over 50,000,000 times a day someone depends on a Kenmore. During the last fifty years, Kenmore has built quite a reputation for reliability. So much so, in fact, that today more people depend on Kenmore than http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

The Grit and Grist of Thinking the Unthinkable House

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 22 (1): 12 – Jan 1, 1992

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1992 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916492X00025
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

12 The Grit and Grist of Thinking the Unthinkable House BEN NICHOLSON Illinois Institute of Technology I. Thinking the Unthinkable The idea of a franchise is an intriguing one because its life rotates about a name. Wherever the name goes an entourage of buildings, desks, stoves, storage bins, and countertops follow-to help make the name substantial. The Appliance House is a franchise of this kind: its name goes to all manner of places. Yet why does it commandeer this particular name? The Appliance House is the direct heir to the sort of house that is endangered by scores of little and big devices that are scattered throughout it. The appliance is examined for its potential selfhood and the unquanti- fiable values that are installed in its very constitution. Sears Roebuck, a firm synonymous with small and large appliances, has a sign in one of its repair centers that describes the mythological impact that Sears has had on the modern home. It declares: "Over 50,000,000 times a day someone depends on a Kenmore. During the last fifty years, Kenmore has built quite a reputation for reliability. So much so, in fact, that today more people depend on Kenmore than

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1992

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