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The G8 and Germany’s Africa Policy: A Case of Hegemonic Mainstreaming

The G8 and Germany’s Africa Policy: A Case of Hegemonic Mainstreaming Global Governance 18 (2012), 471–476 SPECIAL FOCUS The G8 and Germany’s Africa Policy: A Case of Hegemonic Mainstreaming Ulf Engel For the past ten years Germany’s Africa policy has become more driven by the emerging international consensus formed in the United Nations and among the G8 member states but, more importantly, within the European Union on what the African continent’s challenges are and how they should be approached. The multilateralization of Africa policy plays out on ques- tions of trade, peace, and security and in the way that aid relations are gen- erally conditioned to issues of democracy, good governance, and human rights. However, there remains a German “content” in many bilateral rela- tions with African countries, which can be explained by the specific mix of policy instruments and development assistance actors that have their own institutional interests and path-dependent legacies in terms of priorities. Major changes of this particular mix between externally determined and in- ternally driven elements of Africa policy are likely to be influenced by fi- nancial considerations, the future of European integration, and the way that German elites perceive changes in global governance architectures. KEYWORDS: Germany, Africa, foreign policy, Group of 8, European Union, United http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

The G8 and Germany’s Africa Policy: A Case of Hegemonic Mainstreaming

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-01804007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 18 (2012), 471–476 SPECIAL FOCUS The G8 and Germany’s Africa Policy: A Case of Hegemonic Mainstreaming Ulf Engel For the past ten years Germany’s Africa policy has become more driven by the emerging international consensus formed in the United Nations and among the G8 member states but, more importantly, within the European Union on what the African continent’s challenges are and how they should be approached. The multilateralization of Africa policy plays out on ques- tions of trade, peace, and security and in the way that aid relations are gen- erally conditioned to issues of democracy, good governance, and human rights. However, there remains a German “content” in many bilateral rela- tions with African countries, which can be explained by the specific mix of policy instruments and development assistance actors that have their own institutional interests and path-dependent legacies in terms of priorities. Major changes of this particular mix between externally determined and in- ternally driven elements of Africa policy are likely to be influenced by fi- nancial considerations, the future of European integration, and the way that German elites perceive changes in global governance architectures. KEYWORDS: Germany, Africa, foreign policy, Group of 8, European Union, United

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 12, 2012

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