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The Futures of History

The Futures of History 262 REVIEW ARTICLES The Futures of History Reginald Lilly, ed. The Ancients and the Moderns. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 1996. 326 pages including index. A new relation to the past means that we revive the past as our own and as independent of us; it entails being able to discourse with it as well as to let ourselves be questioned by it. Cornelius Castoriadis In reading through the nineteen essays gathered under the title, The Ancients and the Moderns, it becomes clear that the title names not a historical event, like the famous "querelle" between Renaissance and modern thinkers, nor even a discernable theme to which each essay is addressed, but names rather a question animating the whole: how are we to think through the history of philosophy given that we are in some sense situated "after" modernity and its conception of what this history means? This question first appears in Reginald Lilly's introduc- tory essay that finds us situated within the disruption of modern sub- jectivity and its conception of history as "a teleological progression to its (promised) consummation in a scientific metaphysics" (2). With this disruption, Lilly tells us, comes the opening up of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

The Futures of History

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 27 (1): 262 – Jan 1, 1997

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1997 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916497X00156
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

262 REVIEW ARTICLES The Futures of History Reginald Lilly, ed. The Ancients and the Moderns. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 1996. 326 pages including index. A new relation to the past means that we revive the past as our own and as independent of us; it entails being able to discourse with it as well as to let ourselves be questioned by it. Cornelius Castoriadis In reading through the nineteen essays gathered under the title, The Ancients and the Moderns, it becomes clear that the title names not a historical event, like the famous "querelle" between Renaissance and modern thinkers, nor even a discernable theme to which each essay is addressed, but names rather a question animating the whole: how are we to think through the history of philosophy given that we are in some sense situated "after" modernity and its conception of what this history means? This question first appears in Reginald Lilly's introduc- tory essay that finds us situated within the disruption of modern sub- jectivity and its conception of history as "a teleological progression to its (promised) consummation in a scientific metaphysics" (2). With this disruption, Lilly tells us, comes the opening up of

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1997

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