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The Funerary Speech for John Chrysostom, translated with an introduction and commentary by Timothy D. BARNES and George BEVAN, Liverpool University Press: Liverpool 2013 (= Translated Texts for Historians 60). XIII + 193 pp.

The Funerary Speech for John Chrysostom, translated with an introduction and commentary by... Buchbesprechungen The Funerary Speech for John Chrysostom, translated with an introduction and commen­ tary by Timothy D. BARNES and George BEVAN, Liverpool University Press: Liverpool 2013 (= Translated Texts for Historians 60). XIII + 193 pp. This volume offers an annotated English translation of a text first published in full (in an exemplary critieal edition) by Martin Wallraff in 2007 (Oratio Funebris in Laudem SanctiJo­ hannis Chrysostomi, with an Italian translation by C. Rieci, Spoleto 2007). Since the work gives a heavily biased but substantial account of John Chrysostom's life, and was composed by a weil informed writer as soon as news of his death circulated in late 407, the lateness of its proper publication is startling. It did not help that we lack both the original title of the work and the name of its author (though Barnes and Bevan surmise that it may have been a Constantinopolitan clergyman called Cosmas who is listed in later sources as a writer on Chrysostom). But the chief problem was that the famous Chrysostom scholar J. c. Baur, who began work on an edition of the text a hundred years ago, came to the conclusion that the work was of mid-Byzantine date and historieally worthless. It was only an (unpublished) doctoral thesis by F. van Ommeslaeghe (1974) and Wallraffs edition that restored the work (whieh in the fifth century had been used by Sozomen) to its true date and signifieance. The present publieation offers, apart from a reliable translation, an incisive introduc­ tion (in Barnes's familiar and trenchant style), useful notes both historieal and linguistie (that bring out the writer's indebtedness to Chrysostom's characteristie vocabulary) and, as a supplement, translations of a selection of thirty of Chrysostom's letters from exile and of additional material on the saint in Photius' Bibliotheca and the Constantinopolitan Synaxa­ rium. The introduction offers both a list and critieal discussion of the early source material (dismissing a number of homilies attributed to Chrysostom as pseudepigraphal) and several pages (24-32) on the saint's relations with the empress Eudoxia: the familiar story that he compared her to Jezebel and Herodias is shown to be a later fietion. This speech only narrowly predates the much more familiar Dialogue on Chrysostom's life by Palladius (oE whieh there is a servieeable English translation in the Ancient Christian Writers series, vol. 45). Both texts present highly partisan accounts, but since they were written independently they serve on many points to correct each other. Barnes and Bevan cite a negative judgment by Wendy Mayer on Palladius' reliability, but do not pursue the matter: their annotation cites hirn only occasionally, and at the end of their introduction they declare that they decided to leave detailed comparison of the two texts to others. This may disappoint the reader, but they have provided hirn with material that will greatly assist anyone who undertakes this indispensable and fascinating task. Riehard Priee London ßHC 45 (2013)1 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annuarium Historiae Conciliorum Brill

The Funerary Speech for John Chrysostom, translated with an introduction and commentary by Timothy D. BARNES and George BEVAN, Liverpool University Press: Liverpool 2013 (= Translated Texts for Historians 60). XIII + 193 pp.

Annuarium Historiae Conciliorum , Volume 45 (2): 1 – Jan 1, 1

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0003-5157
eISSN
2589-0433
DOI
10.1163/25890433-045-02-90000004
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Abstract

Buchbesprechungen The Funerary Speech for John Chrysostom, translated with an introduction and commen­ tary by Timothy D. BARNES and George BEVAN, Liverpool University Press: Liverpool 2013 (= Translated Texts for Historians 60). XIII + 193 pp. This volume offers an annotated English translation of a text first published in full (in an exemplary critieal edition) by Martin Wallraff in 2007 (Oratio Funebris in Laudem SanctiJo­ hannis Chrysostomi, with an Italian translation by C. Rieci, Spoleto 2007). Since the work gives a heavily biased but substantial account of John Chrysostom's life, and was composed by a weil informed writer as soon as news of his death circulated in late 407, the lateness of its proper publication is startling. It did not help that we lack both the original title of the work and the name of its author (though Barnes and Bevan surmise that it may have been a Constantinopolitan clergyman called Cosmas who is listed in later sources as a writer on Chrysostom). But the chief problem was that the famous Chrysostom scholar J. c. Baur, who began work on an edition of the text a hundred years ago, came to the conclusion that the work was of mid-Byzantine date and historieally worthless. It was only an (unpublished) doctoral thesis by F. van Ommeslaeghe (1974) and Wallraffs edition that restored the work (whieh in the fifth century had been used by Sozomen) to its true date and signifieance. The present publieation offers, apart from a reliable translation, an incisive introduc­ tion (in Barnes's familiar and trenchant style), useful notes both historieal and linguistie (that bring out the writer's indebtedness to Chrysostom's characteristie vocabulary) and, as a supplement, translations of a selection of thirty of Chrysostom's letters from exile and of additional material on the saint in Photius' Bibliotheca and the Constantinopolitan Synaxa­ rium. The introduction offers both a list and critieal discussion of the early source material (dismissing a number of homilies attributed to Chrysostom as pseudepigraphal) and several pages (24-32) on the saint's relations with the empress Eudoxia: the familiar story that he compared her to Jezebel and Herodias is shown to be a later fietion. This speech only narrowly predates the much more familiar Dialogue on Chrysostom's life by Palladius (oE whieh there is a servieeable English translation in the Ancient Christian Writers series, vol. 45). Both texts present highly partisan accounts, but since they were written independently they serve on many points to correct each other. Barnes and Bevan cite a negative judgment by Wendy Mayer on Palladius' reliability, but do not pursue the matter: their annotation cites hirn only occasionally, and at the end of their introduction they declare that they decided to leave detailed comparison of the two texts to others. This may disappoint the reader, but they have provided hirn with material that will greatly assist anyone who undertakes this indispensable and fascinating task. Riehard Priee London ßHC 45 (2013)1

Journal

Annuarium Historiae ConciliorumBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1

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