The Evolution of Hazing: Motivational Mechanisms and the Abuse of Newcomers

The Evolution of Hazing: Motivational Mechanisms and the Abuse of Newcomers © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2011 DOI: 10.1163/156853711X591242 Journal of Cognition and Culture 11 (2011) 241–267 brill.nl/jocc The Evolution of Hazing: Motivational Mechanisms and the Abuse of Newcomers Aldo Cimino * Center For Evolutionary Psychology, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-3210, USA *E-mail: aldo@aldocimino.com Abstract Hazing – the abuse of new or prospective group members – is a widespread and puzzling feature of human social behavior, occurring in divergent cultures and across levels of technological complexity. Some past research has examined the effect of hazing on hazees, but no experimental work has been performed to examine the motivational causes of hazing. This paper has two primary objectives. First, it synthesizes a century of theory on severe initiations and extracts three primary explanatory themes. Second, it examines the dynamics of enduring human coalitions to generate an evolutionary theory of hazing. Two laboratory experiments suggest that one potential function of hazing is to reduce newcomers’ ability to free ride around group entry. These results are discussed in light of two common but largely untested explanations of hazing. Keywords Hazing, initiations, newcomers, coalitional psychology Hazing is the abuse of new or prospective group members (collectively, “new- comers”). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cognition and Culture Brill

The Evolution of Hazing: Motivational Mechanisms and the Abuse of Newcomers

Journal of Cognition and Culture, Volume 11 (3-4): 241 – Jan 1, 2011

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2011 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1567-7095
eISSN
1568-5373
D.O.I.
10.1163/156853711X591242
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2011 DOI: 10.1163/156853711X591242 Journal of Cognition and Culture 11 (2011) 241–267 brill.nl/jocc The Evolution of Hazing: Motivational Mechanisms and the Abuse of Newcomers Aldo Cimino * Center For Evolutionary Psychology, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-3210, USA *E-mail: aldo@aldocimino.com Abstract Hazing – the abuse of new or prospective group members – is a widespread and puzzling feature of human social behavior, occurring in divergent cultures and across levels of technological complexity. Some past research has examined the effect of hazing on hazees, but no experimental work has been performed to examine the motivational causes of hazing. This paper has two primary objectives. First, it synthesizes a century of theory on severe initiations and extracts three primary explanatory themes. Second, it examines the dynamics of enduring human coalitions to generate an evolutionary theory of hazing. Two laboratory experiments suggest that one potential function of hazing is to reduce newcomers’ ability to free ride around group entry. These results are discussed in light of two common but largely untested explanations of hazing. Keywords Hazing, initiations, newcomers, coalitional psychology Hazing is the abuse of new or prospective group members (collectively, “new- comers”).

Journal

Journal of Cognition and CultureBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2011

Keywords: initiations; newcomers; coalitional psychology; Hazing

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