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The Emerging EU Diplomatic System: Opportunities and Challenges after ‘Lisbon’

The Emerging EU Diplomatic System: Opportunities and Challenges after ‘Lisbon’ Diplomacy is under constant pressure to adjust to the changing context in which foreign policy is made. Although many scholars still associate diplomatic action with principles and rules that regulate relations among sovereign states operating in the area of high politics, current practice no longer fully corresponds with this image. The academic literature points to a variety of transformations that have taken place in recent decades. These include the widening scope of diplomacy to new policy issues; the erosion of the distinction between foreign and domestic policy areas; and the increasing diversity in diplomatic players, with a growing role for non-state actors such as transnational corporations, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and multilateral and regional organizations. 1 Within this last group, the European Union is undoubtedly the player that has gone the furthest in developing a new layer of ‘supranational’ diplomacy alongside national foreign policies. Gradually, a process that started in the 1970s as a rather loose form of foreign policy cooperation has become formalized and institutionalized, with the centre of gravity gradually moving from the national capitals to Brussels. The entry into force of the Lisbon Treaty in December 2009 was the most recent step in this long process, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Hague Journal of Diplomacy Brill

The Emerging EU Diplomatic System: Opportunities and Challenges after ‘Lisbon’

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
Subject
Introduction
ISSN
1871-1901
eISSN
1871-191X
DOI
10.1163/187119112X617302
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Diplomacy is under constant pressure to adjust to the changing context in which foreign policy is made. Although many scholars still associate diplomatic action with principles and rules that regulate relations among sovereign states operating in the area of high politics, current practice no longer fully corresponds with this image. The academic literature points to a variety of transformations that have taken place in recent decades. These include the widening scope of diplomacy to new policy issues; the erosion of the distinction between foreign and domestic policy areas; and the increasing diversity in diplomatic players, with a growing role for non-state actors such as transnational corporations, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and multilateral and regional organizations. 1 Within this last group, the European Union is undoubtedly the player that has gone the furthest in developing a new layer of ‘supranational’ diplomacy alongside national foreign policies. Gradually, a process that started in the 1970s as a rather loose form of foreign policy cooperation has become formalized and institutionalized, with the centre of gravity gradually moving from the national capitals to Brussels. The entry into force of the Lisbon Treaty in December 2009 was the most recent step in this long process,

Journal

The Hague Journal of DiplomacyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2012

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