The effect of predator appetite, prey warning coloration and luminance on predator foraging decisions

The effect of predator appetite, prey warning coloration and luminance on predator foraging... The effect of predator appetite, prey warning coloration and luminance on predator foraging decisions Siiri-Lii Sandre 1,4) , Martin Stevens 2) & Johanna Mappes 3) ( 1 Institute of Ecology and Earth Sciences, University of Tartu, Vanemuise 46, 51014 Tartu, Estonia; 2 Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK; 3 Department of Biological and Environmental Science, Centre of Excellence in Evolutionary Research, University of Jyväskylä, Survontie 9, 40100 Jyväskylä, Finland) (Accepted: 26 April 2010) Summary Aposematic prey advertise their defence to visually hunting predators using conspicuous warning colouration. Established theory predicts that aposematic signals should evolve to- wards increased conspicuousness and similarity to enhance predator education. Contrary to theoretical expectations, there is often considerable within- and between-species variation in aposematic signals of animals sharing the same ecological niche, phylogeny and predators. This may be explained by varying responses of predators that weaken the selection pressure for a consistent signal. By presenting painted mealworm larvae as prey to great tits as preda- tors we tested if different aposematic colour patterns have different values as a means of initial protection and learnt avoidance from predators, and how widely birds generalise their learnt avoidance to other http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

The effect of predator appetite, prey warning coloration and luminance on predator foraging decisions

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2010 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
D.O.I.
10.1163/000579510X507001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The effect of predator appetite, prey warning coloration and luminance on predator foraging decisions Siiri-Lii Sandre 1,4) , Martin Stevens 2) & Johanna Mappes 3) ( 1 Institute of Ecology and Earth Sciences, University of Tartu, Vanemuise 46, 51014 Tartu, Estonia; 2 Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK; 3 Department of Biological and Environmental Science, Centre of Excellence in Evolutionary Research, University of Jyväskylä, Survontie 9, 40100 Jyväskylä, Finland) (Accepted: 26 April 2010) Summary Aposematic prey advertise their defence to visually hunting predators using conspicuous warning colouration. Established theory predicts that aposematic signals should evolve to- wards increased conspicuousness and similarity to enhance predator education. Contrary to theoretical expectations, there is often considerable within- and between-species variation in aposematic signals of animals sharing the same ecological niche, phylogeny and predators. This may be explained by varying responses of predators that weaken the selection pressure for a consistent signal. By presenting painted mealworm larvae as prey to great tits as preda- tors we tested if different aposematic colour patterns have different values as a means of initial protection and learnt avoidance from predators, and how widely birds generalise their learnt avoidance to other

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2010

Keywords: COLOUR; LUMINANCE; WARNING SIGNALS; AVIAN VISION; GENERALIZATION

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