The dynamic developmental model of the rights of the child: A feminist approach to rights and sterilisation

The dynamic developmental model of the rights of the child: A feminist approach to rights and... The dynamic developmental model of the rights of the child: A feminist approach to rights and sterilisation MELINDA JONES1 and LEE ANN BASSER MARKS2 1Faculty of Law, University of New South Wales, Australia; 2 School of Law and Legal Studies, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia Introduction It is no longer a matter of dispute that children have rights. The international community has accepted that children need to be acknowledged as people, and that the granting to them of rights is an important means of accepting their uniqueness as well as their special status. What is more problematic is the significance and meaning to be attached to children's rights. Children cannot be assumed to have the same rights and responsibilities as adults, because it is unimaginable that they can be thought of as fully autonomous beings.' Children, by definition, are dependent and vulnerable. They exist, by defini- tion and reality, in the context of families and the apparatus of the state including educational institutions.' Children, then, need to be thought of as having rights and independence within a context of control and dependence. How the concept of children's rights is to be understood, then, is by locating rights http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The International Journal of Children's Rights Brill

The dynamic developmental model of the rights of the child: A feminist approach to rights and sterilisation

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1994 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0927-5568
eISSN
1571-8182
D.O.I.
10.1163/157181894X00187
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The dynamic developmental model of the rights of the child: A feminist approach to rights and sterilisation MELINDA JONES1 and LEE ANN BASSER MARKS2 1Faculty of Law, University of New South Wales, Australia; 2 School of Law and Legal Studies, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia Introduction It is no longer a matter of dispute that children have rights. The international community has accepted that children need to be acknowledged as people, and that the granting to them of rights is an important means of accepting their uniqueness as well as their special status. What is more problematic is the significance and meaning to be attached to children's rights. Children cannot be assumed to have the same rights and responsibilities as adults, because it is unimaginable that they can be thought of as fully autonomous beings.' Children, by definition, are dependent and vulnerable. They exist, by defini- tion and reality, in the context of families and the apparatus of the state including educational institutions.' Children, then, need to be thought of as having rights and independence within a context of control and dependence. How the concept of children's rights is to be understood, then, is by locating rights

Journal

The International Journal of Children's RightsBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1994

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