Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Decline of the IMF: Is It Reversible? Should It Be Reversed?

The Decline of the IMF: Is It Reversible? Should It Be Reversed? Global Governance 12 (2006), 343– 349 GLOBAL INSIGHTS The Decline of the IMF: Is It Reversible? Should It Be Reversed? Heribert Dieter he venue had been chosen thoughtfully. In a speech delivered in New Delhi, capital of an emerging Asian economic power, Mervyn King, governor of the Bank of England, called for a radical reform of the International Monetary Fund (IMF). In unusually stark terms, King cau- tioned against letting the IMF slip into obscurity. The institution needed to be modernized and its tasks reconsidered, he argued in February 2006. Since then, several other central bankers, politicians, and academics have contributed to the debate on the future of the Fund. This discussion on the future of the IMF partly reflects the relative calmness in financial markets. The Fund did not have to manage any major financial crisis in recent years, in contrast to the days of the Asian crisis in 1997 or the collapse of the Argentine economy in 2002. But the debate also reflects a deeper concern over the international financial architecture for the twenty-first century. Two unresolved issues cloud the future of the IMF. First, the gover- nance structures of the Fund itself ought to be changed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

The Decline of the IMF: Is It Reversible? Should It Be Reversed?

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/the-decline-of-the-imf-is-it-reversible-should-it-be-reversed-QnOJF6AL4c
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-01204001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 12 (2006), 343– 349 GLOBAL INSIGHTS The Decline of the IMF: Is It Reversible? Should It Be Reversed? Heribert Dieter he venue had been chosen thoughtfully. In a speech delivered in New Delhi, capital of an emerging Asian economic power, Mervyn King, governor of the Bank of England, called for a radical reform of the International Monetary Fund (IMF). In unusually stark terms, King cau- tioned against letting the IMF slip into obscurity. The institution needed to be modernized and its tasks reconsidered, he argued in February 2006. Since then, several other central bankers, politicians, and academics have contributed to the debate on the future of the Fund. This discussion on the future of the IMF partly reflects the relative calmness in financial markets. The Fund did not have to manage any major financial crisis in recent years, in contrast to the days of the Asian crisis in 1997 or the collapse of the Argentine economy in 2002. But the debate also reflects a deeper concern over the international financial architecture for the twenty-first century. Two unresolved issues cloud the future of the IMF. First, the gover- nance structures of the Fund itself ought to be changed.

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 3, 2006

There are no references for this article.