The Death of Painting (After Plato)

The Death of Painting (After Plato) © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2011 DOI: 10.1163/156916411X558873 Research in Phenomenology 41 (2011) 23–44 brill.nl/rp R e s e a r c h i n P h e n o m e n o l o g y The Death of Painting (After Plato) Ryan Drake Fairfield University Abstract Whereas the entrance of the monochrome into modern art has typically been understood in light of movements in contemporary art and aesthetic theory following in its wake, this essay seeks to understand the motivations for, and the effect of, the monochrome in the work of Aleksandr Rodchenko in 1921 in reference to Plato’s analysis of pure pleasure and absolute beauty in the Philebus . I argue that Rodchenko and Plato were motivated by a shared project to contend with the aesthetic and psychological effects of figurative semblance, or what Socrates calls the phantasm, in order to harmonize human perception with the world of sensuous mate- rial objects. It is in this shared project, I contend, that Rodchenko’s strategy is to be understood as a kind of materialist Platonism that, when viewed phenomenologically, reveals Plato’s objects of absolute beauty to be, in the context of industrial capitalism and the crisis http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

The Death of Painting (After Plato)

Research in Phenomenology, Volume 41 (1): 23 – Jan 1, 2011

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/the-death-of-painting-after-plato-S39VgNHrtO
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2011 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
D.O.I.
10.1163/156916411X558873
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2011 DOI: 10.1163/156916411X558873 Research in Phenomenology 41 (2011) 23–44 brill.nl/rp R e s e a r c h i n P h e n o m e n o l o g y The Death of Painting (After Plato) Ryan Drake Fairfield University Abstract Whereas the entrance of the monochrome into modern art has typically been understood in light of movements in contemporary art and aesthetic theory following in its wake, this essay seeks to understand the motivations for, and the effect of, the monochrome in the work of Aleksandr Rodchenko in 1921 in reference to Plato’s analysis of pure pleasure and absolute beauty in the Philebus . I argue that Rodchenko and Plato were motivated by a shared project to contend with the aesthetic and psychological effects of figurative semblance, or what Socrates calls the phantasm, in order to harmonize human perception with the world of sensuous mate- rial objects. It is in this shared project, I contend, that Rodchenko’s strategy is to be understood as a kind of materialist Platonism that, when viewed phenomenologically, reveals Plato’s objects of absolute beauty to be, in the context of industrial capitalism and the crisis

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2011

Keywords: Plato; painting; Gadamer; constructivism; Philebus; pleasure

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off