THE DEAD SEA SCROLLS AND MEDIEVAL JEWISH STUDIES: METHODS AND PROBLEMS

THE DEAD SEA SCROLLS AND MEDIEVAL JEWISH STUDIES: METHODS AND PROBLEMS 1 I want to thank Lawrence Schi ff man for this succinct description pro ff ered in a casual conversation, which led me into an inquiry of this topic, at the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion and Society of B iblical Literatu re, San Francisco, November 1992. 2 On the name , see M. Gil, A History of Palestine, 634-1099 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992) 784. Gil suggests that the Hebrew term corresponds to the Arabic d¨®in , which refers to Ism¨®Âl missionaries or ÒpropagandistsÓ who THE DEAD SEA SCROLLS AND MEDIEVAL JEWISH STUDIES: METHODS AND PROBLEMS FRED ASTREN San Francisco State University Since the twentieth-century discoveries in the Judean Desert, many scholars have noted similarities in the Scrolls and in medieval Jewish religious phenomena. Some of these similarities are quite marked, found mostly in testimony and sources concerning medieval Islamicate sectarian Judaism. Based upon these similarities some observers have suggested models for religious and historical continuity to connect the Dead Sea Scrolls to medieval Jewish religious movements, including the Magharians and especially the Karaites. Many of the theories that have been suggested are weakened by an inherent two-fold di fŽ culty. 1 The problem, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Dead Sea Discoveries Brill

THE DEAD SEA SCROLLS AND MEDIEVAL JEWISH STUDIES: METHODS AND PROBLEMS

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Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
© 2001 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0929-0761
eISSN
1568-5179
D.O.I.
10.1163/156851701753726060
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 I want to thank Lawrence Schi ff man for this succinct description pro ff ered in a casual conversation, which led me into an inquiry of this topic, at the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion and Society of B iblical Literatu re, San Francisco, November 1992. 2 On the name , see M. Gil, A History of Palestine, 634-1099 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992) 784. Gil suggests that the Hebrew term corresponds to the Arabic d¨®in , which refers to Ism¨®Âl missionaries or ÒpropagandistsÓ who THE DEAD SEA SCROLLS AND MEDIEVAL JEWISH STUDIES: METHODS AND PROBLEMS FRED ASTREN San Francisco State University Since the twentieth-century discoveries in the Judean Desert, many scholars have noted similarities in the Scrolls and in medieval Jewish religious phenomena. Some of these similarities are quite marked, found mostly in testimony and sources concerning medieval Islamicate sectarian Judaism. Based upon these similarities some observers have suggested models for religious and historical continuity to connect the Dead Sea Scrolls to medieval Jewish religious movements, including the Magharians and especially the Karaites. Many of the theories that have been suggested are weakened by an inherent two-fold di fŽ culty. 1 The problem,

Journal

Dead Sea DiscoveriesBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2001

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