The Cunning Dingo

The Cunning Dingo Th e Cunning Dingo Merryl Parker 1 University of Tasmania, Australia Abstract Th e Australian dingo, like the dog , descends from the wolf. However, although dogs have under- gone a lengthy taming process that allows them to fit into human society, dingoes retain many wolf characteristics. Like the wolf and unlike the dog , dingoes do not bark. Dingoes howl; they come into season once a year, and they can dislocate their powerful jaws to seize prey. Since the arrival of settlers and their farming practices in Australia 200 years ago, dingoes have killed sheep, and dogs have learned to protect and control those sheep. Medieval texts admire dogs for their intelligence while denigrating wolves as “cunning”—a word defined as deceitful, craft y, and treacherous. A study of Australian colonial texts reveals a popular representation of the dingo as cowardly, promis- cuous, vicious—and cunning. Th is study compares the representation of dingoes (who by killing sheep worked against the settlers) with the representation of dogs (who protected the farmers’ eco- nomic interests). Finally, the paper examines those colonial writers who, either deliberately or unin- tentionally, allowed the dingo to escape the denigrating representation of cunning. Keywords Dingo, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Society & Animals Brill

The Cunning Dingo

Society & Animals, Volume 15 (1): 69 – Jan 1, 2007

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2007 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1063-1119
eISSN
1568-5306
DOI
10.1163/156853007X169351
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Th e Cunning Dingo Merryl Parker 1 University of Tasmania, Australia Abstract Th e Australian dingo, like the dog , descends from the wolf. However, although dogs have under- gone a lengthy taming process that allows them to fit into human society, dingoes retain many wolf characteristics. Like the wolf and unlike the dog , dingoes do not bark. Dingoes howl; they come into season once a year, and they can dislocate their powerful jaws to seize prey. Since the arrival of settlers and their farming practices in Australia 200 years ago, dingoes have killed sheep, and dogs have learned to protect and control those sheep. Medieval texts admire dogs for their intelligence while denigrating wolves as “cunning”—a word defined as deceitful, craft y, and treacherous. A study of Australian colonial texts reveals a popular representation of the dingo as cowardly, promis- cuous, vicious—and cunning. Th is study compares the representation of dingoes (who by killing sheep worked against the settlers) with the representation of dogs (who protected the farmers’ eco- nomic interests). Finally, the paper examines those colonial writers who, either deliberately or unin- tentionally, allowed the dingo to escape the denigrating representation of cunning. Keywords Dingo,

Journal

Society & AnimalsBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2007

Keywords: FOUCAULT; BULLETIN; DISCOURSE; CUNNING; COLONIAL; DINGO

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