The Courtship of Drosophila Melanogaster

The Courtship of Drosophila Melanogaster THE COURTSHIP OF DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER by MARGARET BASTOCK and AUBREY MANNING 1) (Dept. of Zoology and Comparative Anatomy, Oxford) (With 9 Figs.) (Rec. 18-XI-1955) The males of Drosophila melanogaster perform an elaborate courtship display which may vary in length from a few seconds to many hours. This length depends in part upon the receptiveness of the female fly to which it is directed and also upon the stimulating qualities of the male's display. For instance, a female which has just been fertilized will not accept other males for many hours, no matter how persistently they court her. On the other hand, yellow-mutant males generally have to court females for a longer time than wild-type males. It can be assumed therefore, that their courtship is 'less stimulating than that of the wild type. If one watches a male courting, one can distinguish several distinct elements in the display, and it can be shown experimentally that some of these elements are more stimulating to the female than others. On analysis it is found that yellow males have, on the average, a smaller proportion of these important elements in their courtship than do wild males. (Details of this work will be http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

The Courtship of Drosophila Melanogaster

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1955 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
D.O.I.
10.1163/156853955X00184
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE COURTSHIP OF DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER by MARGARET BASTOCK and AUBREY MANNING 1) (Dept. of Zoology and Comparative Anatomy, Oxford) (With 9 Figs.) (Rec. 18-XI-1955) The males of Drosophila melanogaster perform an elaborate courtship display which may vary in length from a few seconds to many hours. This length depends in part upon the receptiveness of the female fly to which it is directed and also upon the stimulating qualities of the male's display. For instance, a female which has just been fertilized will not accept other males for many hours, no matter how persistently they court her. On the other hand, yellow-mutant males generally have to court females for a longer time than wild-type males. It can be assumed therefore, that their courtship is 'less stimulating than that of the wild type. If one watches a male courting, one can distinguish several distinct elements in the display, and it can be shown experimentally that some of these elements are more stimulating to the female than others. On analysis it is found that yellow males have, on the average, a smaller proportion of these important elements in their courtship than do wild males. (Details of this work will be

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1955

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