Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Court of Justice: Heidegger'sReflections on Anaximander

The Court of Justice: Heidegger'sReflections on Anaximander © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2007 DOI: 10.1163/156916407X227893 Research in Phenomenology 37 (2007) 385–416 www.brill.nl/rp R e s e a r c h i n P h e n o m e n o l o g y Th e Court of Justice: Heidegger’s Reflections on Anaximander David Michael Kleinberg-Levin Northwestern University Abstract I examine Heidegger’s reflections on the Anaximander fragment, concentrating on the question of justice. In his commentary, Heidegger draws on Nietzsche’s thoughts about justice, the will to power, and nihilism to formulate an interpretation of the fragment that connects it to the epochal history and destiny of being. Th is “ontological” interpretation, constructed in a compelling read- ing of the history of philosophy, requires that Heidegger first address the historicism and “onto- logical forgetfulness” prevailing in historical consciousness and historiography, in order to begin thinking towards the possibility of another epoch of being, releasing us from the injustice that is inherent in the ontology that rules in the present historical dispensation. Although Heidegger avoids moral prescription, he cannot avoid critical entanglement in the moral-juridical sense of justice, despite his claims and protestations, since, as his own account of the fragment implies, justice and ontology must http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

The Court of Justice: Heidegger'sReflections on Anaximander

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 37 (3): 385 – Jan 1, 2007

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/the-court-of-justice-heidegger-sreflections-on-anaximander-EtA1sboXOw
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2007 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916407X227893
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2007 DOI: 10.1163/156916407X227893 Research in Phenomenology 37 (2007) 385–416 www.brill.nl/rp R e s e a r c h i n P h e n o m e n o l o g y Th e Court of Justice: Heidegger’s Reflections on Anaximander David Michael Kleinberg-Levin Northwestern University Abstract I examine Heidegger’s reflections on the Anaximander fragment, concentrating on the question of justice. In his commentary, Heidegger draws on Nietzsche’s thoughts about justice, the will to power, and nihilism to formulate an interpretation of the fragment that connects it to the epochal history and destiny of being. Th is “ontological” interpretation, constructed in a compelling read- ing of the history of philosophy, requires that Heidegger first address the historicism and “onto- logical forgetfulness” prevailing in historical consciousness and historiography, in order to begin thinking towards the possibility of another epoch of being, releasing us from the injustice that is inherent in the ontology that rules in the present historical dispensation. Although Heidegger avoids moral prescription, he cannot avoid critical entanglement in the moral-juridical sense of justice, despite his claims and protestations, since, as his own account of the fragment implies, justice and ontology must

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2007

Keywords: tragedy; time; fate; justice; destiny

There are no references for this article.