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The Consequences of the Global Financial Crisis: The Rhetoric of Reformand Regulation. Edited by Wyn Grant and Graham K. Wilson. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012.

The Consequences of the Global Financial Crisis: The Rhetoric of Reformand Regulation. Edited by... Book Reviews 165 available—not necessarily to situations where the most and worst human rights violations occur. This will be controversial for obvious reasons. Hafner-Burton insists that proponents of human rights should not rely only on international legal institutions to achieve their goals because other strategies are likely to be more effective. For instance, states can dangle financial rewards in front of states conditioned on the target state making cer- tain reforms. While undoubtedly states should use their powers to promote and protect human rights, it remains unclear why states would modify their foreign policies to advance this agenda given the incentives that both demo- cratic and nondemocratic leaders face. A benefit of Hafner-Burton’s proposal is that theoretically it could be implemented immediately, without difficult institutional reform. Her cutting-edge overview of the existing empirical lit- erature on why human rights violations occur is useful and her prescriptive proposal deserves serious consideration. Reviewed by Eamon Aloyo The Consequences of the Global Financial Crisis: The Rhetoric of Reform and Regulation. Edited by Wyn Grant and Graham K. Wilson. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012. In The Consequences of the Global Financial Crisis, the chapter authors dis- cuss the effects of the 2008 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

The Consequences of the Global Financial Crisis: The Rhetoric of Reformand Regulation. Edited by Wyn Grant and Graham K. Wilson. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012.

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-02001013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Reviews 165 available—not necessarily to situations where the most and worst human rights violations occur. This will be controversial for obvious reasons. Hafner-Burton insists that proponents of human rights should not rely only on international legal institutions to achieve their goals because other strategies are likely to be more effective. For instance, states can dangle financial rewards in front of states conditioned on the target state making cer- tain reforms. While undoubtedly states should use their powers to promote and protect human rights, it remains unclear why states would modify their foreign policies to advance this agenda given the incentives that both demo- cratic and nondemocratic leaders face. A benefit of Hafner-Burton’s proposal is that theoretically it could be implemented immediately, without difficult institutional reform. Her cutting-edge overview of the existing empirical lit- erature on why human rights violations occur is useful and her prescriptive proposal deserves serious consideration. Reviewed by Eamon Aloyo The Consequences of the Global Financial Crisis: The Rhetoric of Reform and Regulation. Edited by Wyn Grant and Graham K. Wilson. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012. In The Consequences of the Global Financial Crisis, the chapter authors dis- cuss the effects of the 2008

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 19, 2014

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