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The Cardoso Report on the UN and Civil Society: Functionalism, Global Corporatism, or Global Democracy?

The Cardoso Report on the UN and Civil Society: Functionalism, Global Corporatism, or Global... Global Governance 12 (2006), 305– 324 The Cardoso Report on the UN and Civil Society: Functionalism, Global Corporatism, or Global Democracy? Peter Willetts The Report of the Panel of Eminent Persons on United Nations–Civil Soci- ety Relations was published in June 2004. It strongly endorsed the case for wider participation of civil society in all aspects of the UN’s work, both at the headquarters and at the country level. However, the Panel members dis- played little understanding of the existing NGO consultative arrangements. Many of its recommendations were impolitic or impractical. The report was intellectually incoherent because it embodied three competing theoret- ical frameworks: functionalism, neocorporatism, and democratic pluralism. The functionalist emphasis on expertise and the neocorporatist emphasis on engaging stakeholders cannot offer criteria for participation on an all- embracing democratic basis. Reform is needed to provide facilities and KEYWORDS: non- resources to enhance participation by marginalized groups. governmental organizations (NGOs), United Nations, global civil society, Cardoso Report, functionalism, neocorporatism, legitimacy, participation. ongovernmental organizations (NGOs) have been important parti- cipants in the United Nations system since 1945. They have access to intergovernmental meetings, present written statements, make speeches, and lobby for specific texts to be adopted. For the first http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

The Cardoso Report on the UN and Civil Society: Functionalism, Global Corporatism, or Global Democracy?

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-01203006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 12 (2006), 305– 324 The Cardoso Report on the UN and Civil Society: Functionalism, Global Corporatism, or Global Democracy? Peter Willetts The Report of the Panel of Eminent Persons on United Nations–Civil Soci- ety Relations was published in June 2004. It strongly endorsed the case for wider participation of civil society in all aspects of the UN’s work, both at the headquarters and at the country level. However, the Panel members dis- played little understanding of the existing NGO consultative arrangements. Many of its recommendations were impolitic or impractical. The report was intellectually incoherent because it embodied three competing theoret- ical frameworks: functionalism, neocorporatism, and democratic pluralism. The functionalist emphasis on expertise and the neocorporatist emphasis on engaging stakeholders cannot offer criteria for participation on an all- embracing democratic basis. Reform is needed to provide facilities and KEYWORDS: non- resources to enhance participation by marginalized groups. governmental organizations (NGOs), United Nations, global civil society, Cardoso Report, functionalism, neocorporatism, legitimacy, participation. ongovernmental organizations (NGOs) have been important parti- cipants in the United Nations system since 1945. They have access to intergovernmental meetings, present written statements, make speeches, and lobby for specific texts to be adopted. For the first

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 3, 2006

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