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The Buryat Village of Tory in the 1990s: Social and Cultural Re-adaptation in a Small Village Community

The Buryat Village of Tory in the 1990s: Social and Cultural Re-adaptation in a Small Village... <jats:sec><jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>This paper considers whether Tory in Buryatia can survive as a community. It is argued that Tory came to be a unified community under the Soviet regime from the 1930s onwards. As Soviet institutions strengthened, the earlier Buryat society lost its integrity and came to consists of familial groups isolated from and opposed to public life, yet economically dependent on the collective farm. With the 1990s outside support was withdrawn from the collective farm. There is a real possibility that if it collapses altogether, the household economies will collapse with it. It is argued that a large proportion of people in the village have become psychologically accustomed to dependency on the state and may be incapable of self-reliance. Meanwhile, the young generation is oriented to urban and outside culture and may drop out of any process of village adaptation to the new economic conditions.</jats:p> </jats:sec> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Inner Asia Brill

The Buryat Village of Tory in the 1990s: Social and Cultural Re-adaptation in a Small Village Community

Inner Asia , Volume 1 (1): 107 – Jan 1, 1999

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1999 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1464-8172
eISSN
2210-5018
DOI
10.1163/146481799793646376
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<jats:sec><jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>This paper considers whether Tory in Buryatia can survive as a community. It is argued that Tory came to be a unified community under the Soviet regime from the 1930s onwards. As Soviet institutions strengthened, the earlier Buryat society lost its integrity and came to consists of familial groups isolated from and opposed to public life, yet economically dependent on the collective farm. With the 1990s outside support was withdrawn from the collective farm. There is a real possibility that if it collapses altogether, the household economies will collapse with it. It is argued that a large proportion of people in the village have become psychologically accustomed to dependency on the state and may be incapable of self-reliance. Meanwhile, the young generation is oriented to urban and outside culture and may drop out of any process of village adaptation to the new economic conditions.</jats:p> </jats:sec>

Journal

Inner AsiaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1999

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