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The Bodily Dimension in Thinking

The Bodily Dimension in Thinking © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2008 DOI: 10.1163/156916408X336774 Research in Phenomenology 38 (2008) 427–454 www.brill.nl/rp R e s e a r c h i n P h e n o m e n o l o g y Exposing the Body Daniela Vallega-Neu. Th e Bodily Dimension in Th inking . Albany: State Uni- versity of New York Press, 2006. 157 pp. In his beloved Zarathustra , Nietzsche writes: “Of all that is written, I love only that which one has written with his blood. Write with blood: and you will experience that blood is spirit.” 1 Nietzsche goes on to remark on how diffi - cult—impossible?—it is to understand the blood of another. Th is is the site of an extreme decision, such the decision of whether it is better to write with blood, whether it is better to write with one’s body; or whether it is better to become the philosopher, the one who writes for all to understand and thus to write in some universal tongue (whether it is restricted to a language matters none to its universality). Th e risk, of course, if it could be called that, is that the writing in blood http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

The Bodily Dimension in Thinking

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 38 (3): 427 – Jan 1, 2008

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2008 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916408X336774
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2008 DOI: 10.1163/156916408X336774 Research in Phenomenology 38 (2008) 427–454 www.brill.nl/rp R e s e a r c h i n P h e n o m e n o l o g y Exposing the Body Daniela Vallega-Neu. Th e Bodily Dimension in Th inking . Albany: State Uni- versity of New York Press, 2006. 157 pp. In his beloved Zarathustra , Nietzsche writes: “Of all that is written, I love only that which one has written with his blood. Write with blood: and you will experience that blood is spirit.” 1 Nietzsche goes on to remark on how diffi - cult—impossible?—it is to understand the blood of another. Th is is the site of an extreme decision, such the decision of whether it is better to write with blood, whether it is better to write with one’s body; or whether it is better to become the philosopher, the one who writes for all to understand and thus to write in some universal tongue (whether it is restricted to a language matters none to its universality). Th e risk, of course, if it could be called that, is that the writing in blood

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2008

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