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The Archaeology of the Great Wall of the Qin and Han Dynasties

The Archaeology of the Great Wall of the Qin and Han Dynasties © Brill, Leiden 2002 JEAA 3, 1–2 THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE GREAT WALL OF THE QIN AND HAN DYNASTIES BY XU PINGFANG 徐蘋芳 (Institute of Archaeology, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences) Translated by Taotao Huang and John Moffett Abstract This paper traces the routes of the entire length of the Great Wall along China’s northern border in the Qin and Western Han Dynasties. By comparing the results of recent archaeological surveys and excavations with historical records preserved in Sima Qian’s Shiji and Ban Gu’s Hanshu , the various components of the Great Wall can be determined and placed in their proper stages of construction. Introduction The Great Wall of China has been designated by UNESCO as a World Heritage site. The parts of the Great Wall that we see above ground today, which stretch from Jiayuguan 嘉峪關 in the west to Shanhaiguan 山海關 in the east, and include Badaling 八達嶺 near Beijing 北京 , Gubeikou 古北口 , and Mutianyu 慕田峪 , were all constructed in the Ming 明 period. However, most of the Great Wall dating from the Qin 秦 and Han 漢 dynasties over two thousand years ago has, due to the passing of time, been buried; http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of East Asian Archaeology Brill

The Archaeology of the Great Wall of the Qin and Han Dynasties

Journal of East Asian Archaeology , Volume 3 (1): 259 – Jan 1, 2001

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2002 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1387-6813
eISSN
1568-5233
DOI
10.1163/156852301100402822
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

© Brill, Leiden 2002 JEAA 3, 1–2 THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE GREAT WALL OF THE QIN AND HAN DYNASTIES BY XU PINGFANG 徐蘋芳 (Institute of Archaeology, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences) Translated by Taotao Huang and John Moffett Abstract This paper traces the routes of the entire length of the Great Wall along China’s northern border in the Qin and Western Han Dynasties. By comparing the results of recent archaeological surveys and excavations with historical records preserved in Sima Qian’s Shiji and Ban Gu’s Hanshu , the various components of the Great Wall can be determined and placed in their proper stages of construction. Introduction The Great Wall of China has been designated by UNESCO as a World Heritage site. The parts of the Great Wall that we see above ground today, which stretch from Jiayuguan 嘉峪關 in the west to Shanhaiguan 山海關 in the east, and include Badaling 八達嶺 near Beijing 北京 , Gubeikou 古北口 , and Mutianyu 慕田峪 , were all constructed in the Ming 明 period. However, most of the Great Wall dating from the Qin 秦 and Han 漢 dynasties over two thousand years ago has, due to the passing of time, been buried;

Journal

Journal of East Asian ArchaeologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2001

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