Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Arab Spring and Coptic–Muslim Relations: From Mubarak to the Muslim Brotherhood

The Arab Spring and Coptic–Muslim Relations: From Mubarak to the Muslim Brotherhood B. SPECIAL FOCUS MINORITY ISSUES IN THE MIDDLE EAST AND NORTHERN AFRICA Elizabeth Iskander Monier* I. Introduction Egypt's uprising of 25 January 2011 came at a sensitive juncture for Muslim­ Christian relations in Egypt. A few short weeks earlier, Egypt witnessed one of the worst acts of violence against Christians in recent decades when a bomb exploded outside al-Qiddisayn church in Alexandria just after midnight on New Year's Eve. The church was full of worshippers celebrating mass for the New Year and 23 people were killed. After the Alexandria bombing reactions were mixed, with many public figures re-affi rming the entrenched national unity slogans that focus on a narrative of Muslim­Christian coexistence and tolerance in Egypt. At the same time, there were reports of demonstrations in Alexandria demanding a boycott of Christian businesses. Consequently, one of the most encouraging scenes to emerge from the 18-day protest period leading to the ouster of former president Hosni Mubarak on 11 February 2011 was the display of unity among Egypt's various religious communities and the slogan frequently used by protesters: `Muslim, Christian, we are all Egyptian.' Yet, the success in achieving the resignation of Mubarak, a goal that had served as http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Yearbook of Minority Issues Online Brill

The Arab Spring and Coptic–Muslim Relations: From Mubarak to the Muslim Brotherhood

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/the-arab-spring-and-coptic-muslim-relations-from-mubarak-to-the-muslim-ejBr0Fo9Kf
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2014 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1570-7865
eISSN
2211-6117
DOI
10.1163/22116117-90110043
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

B. SPECIAL FOCUS MINORITY ISSUES IN THE MIDDLE EAST AND NORTHERN AFRICA Elizabeth Iskander Monier* I. Introduction Egypt's uprising of 25 January 2011 came at a sensitive juncture for Muslim­ Christian relations in Egypt. A few short weeks earlier, Egypt witnessed one of the worst acts of violence against Christians in recent decades when a bomb exploded outside al-Qiddisayn church in Alexandria just after midnight on New Year's Eve. The church was full of worshippers celebrating mass for the New Year and 23 people were killed. After the Alexandria bombing reactions were mixed, with many public figures re-affi rming the entrenched national unity slogans that focus on a narrative of Muslim­Christian coexistence and tolerance in Egypt. At the same time, there were reports of demonstrations in Alexandria demanding a boycott of Christian businesses. Consequently, one of the most encouraging scenes to emerge from the 18-day protest period leading to the ouster of former president Hosni Mubarak on 11 February 2011 was the display of unity among Egypt's various religious communities and the slogan frequently used by protesters: `Muslim, Christian, we are all Egyptian.' Yet, the success in achieving the resignation of Mubarak, a goal that had served as

Journal

European Yearbook of Minority Issues OnlineBrill

Published: Nov 17, 2014

There are no references for this article.